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Posts tagged with Ecommerce Design

Ecommerce checkout progress indicators: essential, not optional

We often discuss basket abandonment on this blog, and one of the quickest ways to lose your customer is to bore them with a seemingly endless checkout process. 

I say ‘seemingly endless’ because, however long the process really is, if you don’t include some kind of progress indicator then people have no way of telling how close to the end they are.

So they might as well assume they’ve got a long way to go, get bored and give up.


Habitat's new mobile site: Great UX, poor content

Habitat’s traffic has increased by 35% in the past year, and 50% of its customers use mobile and tablet devices to make purchases. 

As a result, Habitat decided to revamp its site with a mobile audience in mind

I thought I would have a dig around the new site to see how well it performs. 


How A/B tests improved add-to-basket levels by almost 30%: Case study

If you’re not constantly testing and tweaking pages on your ecommerce site you could be missing out on potential sales. 

But showing is always more powerful than telling, so I’m going to present you with some solid examples of A/B testing in action, along with the results. 

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10 eye-popping websites that use stunning colour contrast

Yes, it's a shamelessly epicurean roundup of some of the most ocularly orgasmic websites on the wider web.

From ecommerce to agency sites, here are some of the most colourful or contrasting.


AO vs. EE: comparing the 'best' and 'worst' ecommerce sites

Which surveyed more than 10,000 UK online shoppers and asked them to rate their experiences on ecommerce sites in the first six months of 2015.

I thought it would interesting to compare the first place (white goods retailer AO.com) and last place (telecoms brand EE.co.uk) sites to see why they faired so differently.


10 neat innovations to make your ecommerce site more interesting

Here on the blog we insist that if you’re running an ecommerce site, you must get the basics right.

If you’re not testing, collecting and analysing data, and iterating your site so it provides the best customer experience possible, then your business will disappear into a fug of mediocrity.

Make the UX of your site as easy to use and customer-focused as possible. That’s the very basic necessity.

However that doesn’t mean you can’t have fun. 

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11 unusual examples of ecommerce navigation

Celebrating the weird, the different and the atypical.

Sure we have a set few ideas about user experience and what we consider best practice, but that doesn’t mean there isn’t room for experimentation.

The following examples offer a different view, whether it’s in their search tools or in the way they present their products.

Some of the following are perhaps better in principle rather than execution, and none of them should be considered as anything more than ‘interesting’, however you may just find some inspiration here…


How Debenhams' site redesign led to ecommerce sales growth

Debenhams has recently reported a 16.7% growth in ecommerce sales in the last 15 weeks (ending 13 June) on the same period last year.

According to the retailer this has been attributed to lower delivery charges and “further improvements to [our] online presentation.”


12 interactive examples of ecommerce product pages

Here at Econsultancy we’re all about encouraging the quickest, easiest journey from product page to checkout as possible. Not just from a conversion point of view but also from a customer experience one.

This is certainly true of customers who know exactly what they want and don’t have to do any research about the product itself. ”I want a Julio Iglesias Greatest Hits CD and I want it now damn it!”


How Western brands can break into China: the experts' view

China. We all know it's a huge market and that it will be part of our business efforts in the future.  

But at our recent Digital Outlook 2015 event I think even the most savvy were surprised at the scale of the Chinese market - and how different it is to the West.


Nike vs. Adidas: which provides the best ecommerce experience?

Lace up your sneakers, put your sweat bands through the washing machine, make a pitiful attempt at a couple of lunges and let’s go for a run.

Don’t worry, I’ll catch you up later. I just have some work to finish around… this… uh… hot-dog.

Nike is the world’s most valuable sports brand according to Forbes. It has a market value of $71bn, $19bn of which is estimated to be pure brand value. Nike also commands 62% of the US athletic footwear market.

Impressive stuff, but what of its nearest sporting rival Adidas? Has it been left puffing and wheezing, meters behind its striding opponent as it desperately rummages around its kit bag looking for an inhaler?


Guest checkout test: which of these 30 UK retailers force users to register?

Forcing users to register their details before they checkout is one of the quickest ways to lower your conversion rate. 

Once a customer is ready to buy something from your store, presenting them with page after page of forms in which they need to fill out the most unnecessary of personal details is a sure fire way to litter your site with abandoned baskets and disgruntled customers.

That’s why guest checkout is a must-have feature for almost every online retail experience.

As I mentioned in my best practice guide to guest checkouts having a guest checkout doesn’t necessarily mean losing out on valuable customer data, it means adopting practices that put the customer experience first. 

Using guest checkout as the default option, then offering to ‘save the customer details’ after purchase can help lower cart abandonment.

Saving customer details implies convenience, it puts customer experience as the primary focus. ‘Registering’ implies future marketing spam.

Also, if your site automatically fills in any details that the customer has already given you, such as name, address and email, all your customer needs to do is choose a password.

Boom! Conversion achieved. Customer satisfaction achieved. Data achieved. Easy.