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Posts tagged with Copywriting

about us

19 examples of cringeworthy 'about us' agency copy

Here is a checklist you can hold against your agency’s ‘about us’ section. Don't worry, it is equal parts 'do' and 'don't'.

Make sure you weed out examples of the latter and add in some of the former and your copy should improve. This list is solely about the content of your copywriting, the words you choose, not the formatting or style.

If you wonder why I’m qualified to create such a checklist, I can only cite my personal and professional interests in writing. I haven’t worked for many clients or won any awards but I have doggedly scrolled through many agency websites.

I must say that my favourite, in the end, was e3, which forgoes an 'about us' section altogether, opting instead for a little piece of copy on the homepage.

However, there are lots of great 'about us' pages out there, and even some of the 'don'ts' I have gathered work well in context. That means having a great copywriter on your team is essential.

Aside from this checklist, other resources worth looking at include my post on building a personal brand, and Chris Lake’s oldie-but-goodie, the A-Z of online copywriting.

fountain pen

How small copywriting changes can lead to big increases in conversions

It’s easy to overlook the value of copywriting in web design as there are so many other factors to take into account, many of which have a more obvious impact on the user experience.

But as a writer I’m obviously keen to highlight the impact that good copywriting can have on conversions and revenue.

As such I’ve rounded up several case studies which show that even small tweaks to copywriting can have a big impact on conversions, particularly on calls-to-action.

For more information on this topic, read our blog post on 11 useful examples of copywriting for product recommendations or book yourself onto our online copywriting training course...


How product descriptions vary among nine fashion retailers

Copywriting is just one of the elements that combine to make up an effective ecommerce product page.

The product description needs to be informative and sell the benefits of the item, while also being concise enough to retain the customer’s interest.

Copywriting also goes some way to contributing to a brand’s identity, as the tone and type of language used will impact how customers perceive the site.

To show the extent to which the quality of copywriting varies among major retailers I’ve pulled together nine examples of product descriptions for the same pair of Levi 510 skinny jeans.

wonga logo

What can high street banks learn from Wonga.com?

Is it any wonder that those in need of a loan (and a fast one) turn to Wonga and not a high street bank? 

One is approachable and colourful and isn’t full of boring text or ambiguous wording, and the other is an institution the public has gradually learned to call the enemy. 

Of course, the two aren’t really comparable. The need to turn to Wonga is often caused by desperation (and being desperate is a reality for lots of people post 2008). And Wonga itself is gradually acquiring a reputation as not exactly a pillar of the community, as many are educated about the realities of interest rates. 

However, despite selling different products, Wonga still has lots to teach the high street banks. More and more customers turn to banking websites before their branches, but the bank websites are often dry and difficult to use (albeit with some very nice mobile app alternatives).

So, to demonstrate how the user experience for some banks compares to Wonga, I’m going to look at the recently re-launched ‘people’s bank’, or TSB. And for a fairer comparison, I’ll look at Lloyds Bank, too.

Chiefly I’ll look at the 'approachability' of the homepage and the copy therein, as totems for the service on offer.

recycle bin

10 emails I have deleted and why

Before we get started, I have two apologies to make: one to every company featured in this blog post (my opinion obviously has little bearing on the success of your marketing efforts), and another for writing a post with a wholly negative premise.

In my defence, it’s often a lot easier to run your own emails against a checklist of ‘do nots’, as it arguably supplies some super-quick fixes.

Anyway, off we go.


Why I hate webinars, and the importance of copywriting for UX

Webinars are annoying, ultimately, because we are designed for face to face communication. However, they are extremely useful if your colleagues and customers are ‘global’.

There are many annoying things about webinar tech, but most of them centre on UX. And central to UX is getting your language right.

Webex, as my chosen example, simply didn’t work with a good copywriter when laying out its back-end and webinar UI. I can’t speak for others such as Adobe Connect, as I haven’t used them myself.

I don’t think Webex is attempting to appear natty or complex, using slightly mystifying words or combinations of words. It’s just badly written.

Here are some examples:

1 comment

How Best Buy, John Lewis and other retailers handle product descriptions for technical items

Detailed product information is essential for achieving conversions as customers obviously can’t touch the product so retailers need to provide all the relevant details through images, product descriptions, reviews and videos.

This is an easy enough task for simple product such as DVDs, books and some clothing items, but electronics and other technical products require a great deal more information.

The challenge is then to try and present all the relevant information in a clear and concise manner that doesn’t cause the reader to lose interest and go elsewhere.

A case in point is the Samsung 3D 51” plasma TV which retails at around £1,800. It’s not the sort of purchase that most people will make on a whim, so retailers have to provide detailed information to ensure customers are happy to part with their cash.

With this in mind, I browsed a number of ecommerce sites to see how they deal with product descriptions for this particular TV.


30+ powerful adjectives and verbs for eye-catching headlines

It has been a long-standing belief of mine that writers need to create headlines that sell, in order to persuade people to click. 

A descriptive headline isn’t good enough, despite what the SEO Class Of 2006 might tell you, and neither is a clever pun, which will no doubt horrify traditional sports journalists all over the world.

Adding a punchy or emotive word to a headline is absolutely vital to enticing that all-important click, and it can really help encourage sharing. 

This is where adjectives and verbs come into play.

Starbucks email

10 things I love about your emails (and related arts)

I love emails with clear creative and natty features. I did a post about my love. Now here’s another post.

As a Brucie bonus I’ve included many links to related arts. Get creative and maybe you, too, can yank some love from my inbox.

Adestra 2013 Subject Line Report

152 killer keywords for email subject lines (and 137 crappy ones)

We had a hunch that word choice in email subject lines have a strong effect on response rates.  So, we tested 287 keywords across a sample of 2.2bn emails to see which work, and which don’t. 

Why? Because President Obama has done more for email marketing than any world leader in the history of mankind. How? By focusing on subject line testing, his digital team optimised their donation campaigns to generate hundreds of millions of dollars online.

Despite Obama’s best efforts, most marketers still view email marketing as the Bluth Company’s Banana Stand of Arrested Development fame: a more boring and less sexy marketing channel than pretty much anything else imaginable. 

But – and never forget this – there’s always money in the banana stand! There is great power in optimising subject lines.

In case you missed my presentations at MarketingWeekLive last week, you can find out more about our findings after the jump.


Seven ways to get prospects to do what you want

What would it take to get you to do what I want? If I looked you in the eye when asking? If it was a Tuesday? If your name sounded like mine?

According to scientists, it’s the last. We feel more warmly towards people or things we associate with ourselves, like if my name was Mary Anne and yours was Marilyn. They’re close enough in sound and visual likeness that I’d be more apt to do you a favor than one for, say, Richard or Jennifer.

These kinds of findings, argued Nancy Harhut at Integrated Marketing Week, have implications for marketers because we’re trying to get people to do things all the time: click on a link, choose our product over another, like our company on Facebook.

Knowing the instinctive, reflexive behaviors that people rely on when making decisions helps our marketing strategies and how we go about designing the prompts or triggers to get others to do what we want.

Harhut identified seven that will help you on your way to world domination.

American Dad

10 interesting examples of PPC creative for Father's Day

Here's a quick look at some search terms and paid ads ahead of Father's Day.

Some ads were optimised but dry, others made me laugh unintentionally, and some targeted the longer tail.