{{ searchResult.published_at | date:'d MMMM yyyy' }}

Loading ...
Loading ...

Enter a search term such as “mobile analytics” or browse our content using the filters above.

No_results

That’s not only a poor Scrabble score but we also couldn’t find any results matching “”.
Check your spelling or try broadening your search.

Logo_distressed

Sorry about this, there is a problem with our search at the moment.
Please try again later.

Posts tagged with Content

Five cool things you can do with WordPress

This blog post is based on a presentation given at last week’s BrightonSEO entitled ‘Cool shit you can do with WordPress’ but to call it that I’ll have to check if we’re allowed to say it first.

Depending on what the headline above says right now will let you know the outcome of that little query.

I’ve covered WordPress extensively on the blog, taking new users through sign-up, the best responsive templates and SEO best practice, but there are always more tips and tricks to learn.

Patrick Hathaway is the SEO consultant at Hit Reach and he had these tips to offer on how you can make the most out of the WordPress platform. 

3 comments

Looking at the pros and cons of tag tracking

Firstly, thanks for all the great comments and emails I received following the first instalment of this article.

A lot of people commented on the many overlaps between the themes and particularly around the tagging requirements.

Tagging is a great area to explore, so I thought I would take this and a few of the other themes that were proffered before looking at areas to postpone focus, in the next instalment.

If you would like to see these prioritised further or which companies are differentiating themselves in this space, please let me know or add in the comments field below.

0 comments
bill gates

How The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation's interactive 2014 letter doubled its reach

Last week I attended Sitecore Digital Trendspot 2014 and listened to the UK CEO of POSSIBLE, Justin Cooke, speak on how his agency helped transform the annual missive from The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and more than doubled its expected reach.

As you are probably aware, Bill Gates has dedicated much of his recent life and indeed billions of dollars to philanthropy.

In 2000 The William H Gates Foundation was renamed The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and as of 2008 Gates has taken a full-time role co-chairing the charitable foundation.

By May 2013 Bill Gates had donated 28bn dollars to the foundation and yet is still currently the richest man on the planet with a personal fortune of $76bn. 

The foundation’s aim is to tackle the world’s ‘toughest problems’. Extreme poverty and poor health in developing countries, and the failures of America’s education system.

One of the key methods of communication that the foundation uses is an annual letter, written by Bill Gates himself, in which he shares in a frank way the foundation’s goal, where progress is being made and where it is not.

0 comments
blender

The challenge of blending content with data: discussion and infographic

How to use content effectively at each stage of the funnel, from awareness to lead generation, lead management to sales and retention?

I moderated a discussion at Econsultancy’s Digital Cream event yesterday about B2B content marketing and this was among the many things we talked about.

Of course, one of the discussion points was how to ensure content is good, ergo in the right format and length most appropriate for the customer’s location in the funnel, as well as best suited to your specific product and sector.

Creating good content may also entail curating content held internally, making sure that it is repurposed in ways that suit the customer, perhaps dialling down some of the technical fervour within your organisation to make things easily ‘digestible’.

But aside from these myriad discussions about content formats (what it takes to be a good writer/editor/producer, who should create the content and how often) there was a bigger beast to slay.

That beast is a mess of data that may be inaccurate. A consensus that the buying journey often affords a company only ‘one shot at a customer’ was clear for many of the people I talked to. Having good data and a good contact strategy is key.

In this post I thought I’d continue the spirit of Digital Cream and spark discussion of combining content with customer data. I’ve also shared an infographic from Experian Data Quality, discussing data quality more generally, and the impact it has on businesses.

1 comment

No one cares: three reasons your sales pitch isn't working

The strongest aspect of the roundtables Econsultancy runs around the world is that marketers drive the conversation. If they want to jump from emerging trends to what annoys them about digital marketing sales pitches, we’re happy to sit back and learn something.

That’s just what happened at one of our South by Southwest roundtables, co-hosted by Rapp and Adometry. What emerged was the start of this list of dos and don’ts that we hope will help save time and sanity on both sides of the table.

In this post, client-side marketers share their unvarnished advice on how digital marketing sales people should improve their pitches.

6 comments

How to keep infrequent purchasers engaged

Whether it’s a few hours, a day, a week, two months, or ten years, purchase cycles exist for every product.

The length of the cycle usually reflects the magnitude of the purchase, with smaller items such as cups of coffee having a typically short purchase cycle and more significant transactions such as cars or fitted kitchens tending towards far longer cycles.

1 comment
axel springer hackday

Axel Springer: how a big media company fostered a startup mentality

The Axel Springer group is pretty big, it’s active in 44 countries and generated revenue of €3.3bn in 2012.

13,650 people are employed across the group, which includes more than 230 publications such as Bild, but also companies such as Zanox (which includes Affiliate Window).

But despite its size, Axel Springer is using startups and a new culture to drive digital change and growth across the group.

This has been a big step and is a trend we’re seeing in many industries – see John Lewis’ recent announcement of JLabs, a call for entrepreneurs with a £100,000 investment to the best new startup.

At Digital Media Strategies 2014, Springer Electronic Media CTO Ulrich Schmitz talked to us about developing a digital portfolio.

How does one develop new business models in the light of digital? What is the best way to foster innovation and entrepreneurship? And when does one integrate digital investments or indeed keep them separate.

0 comments

16 content marketing examples that hit the sweet spot

Last year I watched a panel debate on the following question: “Is it content, or is it an advertisement?” The panelists went round and round in circles for an hour, and there was no conclusion. My own thinking is along the lines of “it doesn’t really matter, and it’s probably both.”

I happen to think that we have entered a new golden age for advertising. The very best ads are conceived as shareable content experiences, and we’ve only just scratched the surface of what’s possible.

Unfortunately most TV and radio ads are still utterly intolerable, but I feel that the bar has been raised in recent years, driven by YouTube, social media, audience participation, and aspirations to be more creative. The best ads are anchored around compelling content. Execution, as with most things, is paramount. Combine the two and you might have a big hit on your hands. 

There is a flipside: a lousy idea executed brilliantly is still a lousy idea. If the content is underwhelming then you will have to pay to gain reach. So much for earned media. If you are paying a small fortune to seed your content then you’re very much in the realms of paid media. I call this ‘the shareability gap’, and I believe that brands should invest in creativity, not media.

If a brand has paid for the content, then it pretty much wants you to buy something, or at the very least like it a little bit more, but that doesn’t mean that the content has to suck.

Here are some non-sucky content marketing campaigns that I’ve seen recently. I’ve taken quite a broad brush approach here with regards to formats: there are ads, pop-up installations, photographic collections, blogs, and helpful guides. I like the ideas and the execution. Have a look and do let me know what you think...

3 comments

The dirty secrets of clickbait. This post will blow your mind!

Over the past year or two, sites like Buzzfeed and Upworthy have introduced a new type of content marketing to the masses.

Lovingly referred to as clickbait, it has so thoroughly revolutionised the way content is shared that there are rumours Facebook has tried to ban it.

So why do people have such a love/hate relationship with these entertaining articles? And what can marketeers learn from clickbait marketing?

13 comments

The 21 reasons why your boss should pay you to browse reddit

Occasionally you see an incredulous question posted to reddit, along these lines: “What job do you have that allows you to browse reddit?”

I happen to think that all kinds of professionals should keep a close eye on reddit, as it is an ever-changing repository of the best content and discussion on the internet. Yes, there are too many cat gifs, but scratch below the surface and it is a fantastic place to find inspiration, examples, insight and expertise. 

I thought I’d provide an overview of some of the categories (aka ‘subreddits’) that are worth subscribing to. Each of these subreddits has plenty to offer, especially for those of you - like me - who work in the digital industry. Creative and marketing folk would do well to tune in.  

For the uninitiated, The Observer's Tom Lamont recently published an insightful feature on reddit, which covers a lot of ground. Be sure to install the Reddit Enhancement Suite and download Alien Blue for your smartphone. Both are world class examples of apps that help extend and improve on the overall experience of a website (in terms of usability, and content access / discovery / bookmarking). 

Right then, where shall we start?

4 comments

A blogger’s guide to setting up a WordPress site: 14 vital widgets

This is the third in a series of posts discussing how to set up and run a WordPress blog from a relatively experienced expert, which will feature many helpful and hopefully relevant tangents.

In the first article I discussed the first few steps involving sign-up, the difference between WordPress.com and WordPress.org, and your social media presence.

Last week, I looked at writing your first post using the WordPress content management system (CMS) and I also offered some general writing tips for new bloggers.

This time I’ll be delving into the dashboard to help you set up the ‘backend’ of your blog, by taking a look at the diverse world of widgets.

Firstly though a quick note about the difference between WordPress.com and WordPress.org in relation to ‘plugins’.

3 comments
hunter s thompson

A blogger’s guide to setting up a WordPress site: writing your first post

This is the second in a series of posts discussing how to set up and run a WordPress blog from a relatively experienced expert, which will feature many helpful and hopefully relevant tangents.

Last time I discussed the first few steps, involving sign-up, the difference between WordPress.com and WordPress.org, and your social media presence.

In this article I’ll discuss writing your first post using the WordPress content management system (CMS), but first, here are some general writing tips for bloggers using any platform.

6 comments