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Posts tagged with Community Management

Holding hands

Three ways community management drives loyalty for charities

Clever copywriting and agile newsjacking are important, but it’s those organisations embedding empathy into their social media mix who are seeing greater success.

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A look inside Fender’s rock’n’roll content strategy

Fender and Gibson are the two most iconic guitar brands in the world.

Last week I took a look at Gibson’s excellent content marketing strategy and today, you guessed it, I’m going to do the same for Fender.

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shell logo

Digital transformation: a war of attrition at Shell

Digital transformation is a bit of a headache to read or write about.

That’s because discussion of organisational change often strays into the abstract, which, as anyone who has ever looked at twenty Kandinskys in a row can attest, is pretty boring.

That’s why I find Shell really interesting. At a recent event at the IAB, Shell’s global media manager spoke about the transformation of the company, but he did so in refreshingly simple terms.

Americo Sanchez Silva outlined some things Shell has done in digital recently that it hasn’t done before. This encouraged me to think of digital transformation as a war of attrition.

You need to know where your company can improve and then go ahead and do it.

Don’t get me wrong, I still understand that discussions about management, processes, skills, the board, culture etc. are all important, especially for such a large multinational company under one brand as Shell. However, sometimes it’s good to look at the wood, as well as the trees.

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Carla Eid

Carla Eid on community, content and Microsoft Mobile Connects

Carla Eid is head of Microsoft Mobile's Connects programme, its community of customers and advocates.

I asked her a few questions about what working with that community entails. How does the brand get involved and what benefits does it see across content production but also, of course, in sales.

Take a look and, in the community spirit, feel free to leave comments or further questions.

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facebook like

A guide to the new power of Facebook advertising

A friend of mine with a new app-fronted business was recently waxing lyrical about Facebook advertising.

He told me it was great value for money when targeting users with a call-to-action to download his app, especially when users are in a specific location on their mobiles.

I've also heard lots of people talking about the power of targeting audiences on Facebook, either from a standing start or by uploading your own data and spreading out from there.

Due to the fact that it's still difficult to track users across different devices, Facebook's advertising is gaining prominence. The network is accessed on mobile by the overwhelming majority of its subscribers.

In this post I thought I'd give a brief overview of ad formats and targeting, as well as some insight into where the platform is going and how to succeed.

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why did you choose to buy an electronic car? - Nissan

How content marketing can cater for increasingly savvy customers

Content marketing is a big deal, but the term will disappear as we realise all marketing is defined by its content.

Econsultancy's Chris Lake made a similar point when recently introducing a list of great content from brands. He argued that the difference between advertising and content is moot.

Shouldn’t all advertising be thought of as at least one of: funny/useful/inspiring/informative etc? Obviously the answer is yes, but the reality is a little different.

Content marketing is still a hugely popular term. One can point to tens of thousands of Google searches every month, the jagged rise of the term shown on Google Trends, and the astounding success of Lake’s periodic table of content marketing, which has been shared more than 5,000 times in less than a week.

The broader trend though is a consumer enabled by the internet to become ever more informed, an instantaneous autodidact on a previously unimaginable scale. Basically, savvier than ever.

So how do brands make sure that savvy customers’ power is appropriated? The answer is through communities, through providing content that effectively takes ownership of a particular question or problem. This can be as simple as ‘should I buy a Nissan Leaf?’ (read on for more) or ‘how do I care for my baby?’.

Let’s take a look at a couple of examples.

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tame dashboard, for twitter search and digest

Start Me Up! A profile of Twitter client Tame

As Twitter grows, it's more difficult to digest your own activity, to search for trends and content, and to find the right people to engage with.

To the already swollen ranks of Twitter clients comes Tame. Tame claims to provide further context for the user.

I asked a few questions of their team, to find out more about the service.

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I CAN HAZ ENGAGEMENT?

The complete guide to creating compelling marketing tweets

I like to think I've seen a lot of tweets, enough to know a good one when I see it.

So often, I am completely exasperated looking at the dadaist sludge that dribbles out of corporate and brand Twitter accounts. So I've decided to do something about it and write this complete guide to writing interesting tweets.

It's somewhat subjective, but I've given at least 60 tweets here to illustrate my various points. I'll define interesting as something funny/persuasive/compelling/thought-provoking/informative etc - pretty much any tweet that can draw the user's attention.

There is a lot of 'don't' as well as a lot of 'do', and of course, knowing your brand and your audience is key to interesting your followers.

Hopefully there'll be some scenarios you recognise in here, and some reminders.

Please leave your pet hates and great loves in the comments below.

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angry red comment balloon

When bad comments happen to good websites

Publishers who permit disrespectful, spammy comments about their stories are discouraging people looking for intelligent conversations and undermining their brands.

They should implement policies, such as moderated comments, to create a more civil discourse.

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If you measure social success by 'likes', you’re going to get click farms

Let’s be honest. Click farms aren’t exactly a big secret. Buying ‘likes’ and Twitter followers is a well-known shady practice.

What the Channel 4 Dispatches investigation on #fakefans has shown us is the process behind the (fake) stats.

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Social media and the financial sector: eight best practice tips

As of April 1, the Financial Services Authority has been replaced by two new bodies, the Prudential Regulatory Authority (PRA), which regulates the operations of financial organisations, and the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), which monitors how financial organisations treat consumers.

As far as the FCA is concerned, whether financial organisations choose to communicate over social media channels or in print, the rules remain the same.

The communication must be clear, fair and not misleading, regardless of which channel the message is broadcast over.

The FCA has already stated its intention to monitor what financial organisations are getting up to on social media, and it uses Twitter itself.

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How to manage and curate social media for live events

Today, live events and social media go hand in hand. Get your social media management right and you can enhance the live event experience not just for attendees, but for those watching via Twitter, Facebook or Google+.

Social media can contribute to the success of an event, whether it’s a conference, a sports match, or live chat during a TV show.

But with people posting to different channels from all angles, it’s hard to know where to begin managing and curating all that content in order to improve the experience of attendees and viewers, and not swamp them.

Fret not: here’s how to run a tight ship.

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