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Posts tagged with Comcast

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Is there anything at all we can take from that Comcast cancellation call?

Ryan Block called Comcast to cancel his service. An argumentative agent seemingly couldn’t believe this was happening and almost refused to comply.

Here’s the phone call. If you can listen to it all, do so. It feels like a sermon on how not to do customer service.

Plenty of people are writing about this. But is it anything more than a bad agent?

Here’s what I take from it.

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ICANN reveals new gTLD applications

After lots of media attention, speculation and intrigue, ICANN today finally revealed which organizations applied for new gTLDs and which gTLDs they applied for.

All told, ICANN received 1,930 applications, well more than the 1,200-plus figure previously cited. Each applicant ponied up $185,000 per application just for the privilege of applying.

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NBC to broadcast every event for 2012 London Olympics

London's 2012 Olympic Games are fast approaching, and NBC, which has television rights to the Olympics through 2020, is doing everything it can to recoup its substantial investment.

That's good news for viewers in the United States this year because NBC's strategy will make the 2012 Games coverage the most extensive yet.

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Will Microsoft beat Apple and Google to make Connected TV work?

Microsoft and Comcast recently announced that Xbox Live users will now be able to stream on-demand Comcast Xfinity content through their gaming consoles. It’s been insinuated by some that Microsoft is making some form of payment to Comcast for the deal.

This doesn’t seem outlandish. The 20 million paying Xbox Live users (out of 66 million Xbox 360 units sold) now spend slightly more time streaming content than they do playing video games. Microsoft will keep stoking this trend, pushing its hardware further into the profitable mainstream of entertainment content consumption.

But, will the Xbox grow up to become a more dominant mode of delivery?

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Analytics tools for social TV on display at Televisual Expo

Network execs, client-side reps, and ad folks crowded the Televisual Expo organized by the Collaborative Alliance in New York City’s financial district last week.

The small but crowded tradeshow featured 50 vendors of heavyweights, such as DirecTV and Comcast, and newbies such as Tapjoy, which FastCompany featured last month in its list of most innovative firms.

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Comcast rejects a Netflix partnership

If you ran a cable company facing the very real phenomenon of cord-cutting and you're approached about a partnership by one of the companies that has arguably done more to spur cord-cutting than any other, what would you say?

If you're Comcast, the answer is simple: 'take a hike.' And according to the New York Times, that's precisely what it has told Netflix.

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To prevent cord cutting, cable networks embrace the web

Are cable customers ditching their cords, or shaving them? While the debate over what cable customers are doing and planning to do with their cords continues, one thing is clear: cable players are concerned.

So in an effort to prevent cord cutting, they're increasing looking to find ways to embrace the channel cord cutting is blamed on the internet.

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Why are marketers neutral on net neutrality?

It seems all anyone's talking about in terms of online policy these days is Facebook's privacy kerfluffle. Which is kind of a big deal, but small potatoes, really, when compared to the really big, burning, important issue of the day: net neutrality.

This critical issue may not be at the forefront of news, opinion columns and debate in the media, but the fact that digital marketers and e-commerce providers are ignoring it is as baffling as it is inexcusable. The major broadband providers: Comcast, Verizon, AT&T and Time Warner want to tax content providers. They want to determine what sites their subscribers can access, and how quickly - giving priority, of course, to their own products and services.

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The demise of the brand relationship

Brands are working harder than ever to decide what course to take to engage with their audiences' world and sell more. Many say brands need to evolve, but more signs are showing that a complete rebirth is a better bet.

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TV Everywhere has a lot to learn from Hulu. Not that it will listen.

Network television is moving forward with TV Everywhere, its plan to move television content online, but it looks like there are more than a few aspects of television broadcasting that executives are not willing to forgo — namely the ad load.

At the Cable & Telecommunications Association for Marketing Summit in Denver this week, cable executives made it clear that TV Everywhere will not be a "Hulu for cable."

And why would it be? Hulu works.

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Comcast will unroll not quite TV Everywhere by year's end

Comcast's version of "TV Everywhere" is going to be rolling out soon, but rather than complete television programming streaming everywhere, it's starting to look more like "Some TV on a computer. Near your TV." The company's CEO announced that their online video service will launch later this year. But it will take awhile for Roberts' vision of "pay once, consume anywhere" to come to fruition.

For starters, Comcast can only authenticate viewers in their own homes at launch.

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Comcast rolls out national DNS hijacking

Like many ISPs, Comcast is rolling out a new DNS redirect strategy, euphemistically called a "domain helper."

Usually misspelled URLs send web surfers to error pages, but DNS redirection takes advantage of those mistakes, redirecting viewers to ad covered portals when they mistype or get a URL wrong. It's a passive advertising strategy that has garnered a wide amount of critics but continues to grow in popularity with ISPs searching around for revenue streams. 

Comcast is positioning its decision to show more ads and slow down web surfing as an additional "service" available to customers. Let's take a look at Comcast's opt-out policy to see how helpful this plan will actually be for consumers.

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