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Posts tagged with Checkout

asos checkout

Eight ecommerce checkout design features that make ASOS great

ASOS uses a combination of best practice design, quirky copywriting and micro UX to create a simple and fun checkout experience.

Here, I pick out eight features that make the ASOS checkout great.

(p.s. if you have created a great user experience recently, you've got until June 17th to enter the Masters of Marketing Awards)

5 comments
topman

Topman vs. Next: who has the best purchase journey UX?

Why am I comparing two well-known fashion retailers and their ecommerce sites?

Well, though many conventions of web design are well-established, it still surprises me how different ecommerce sites can be, even in the nuts and bolts of basket and checkout.

So, I thought I'd look at two quite different fashion retailers, and see how they match up.

8 comments

How Mango can improve its otherwise excellent ecommerce site

Mango is a Spanish fashion retailer founded on 1984 that now has more than 2,000 stores in 103 countries, 150 of which are in the UK.

Mango has also been operating its ecommerce site for around 15 years and it makes for an interesting study in highly innovative retail site design, but with areas that could definitely use an improvement.

Here we’ll take a look at what works on the site from a customer experience and usability point of view first, before highlighting where it could be more effective.

2 comments

35 examples of ecommerce best practice from Hobbycraft

Hobbycraft is not a website we’ve covered on the blog before. It’s not the showiest website, it doesn’t feature the most technically dazzling array of tools and features, nor is it currently in the news for any particular reason.

So why cover it now? Because Hobbycraft gets the basics of ecommerce just right.

Out of all the sites I’ve researched so far, this one manages to include almost every ecommerce best practice feature that we’re constantly banging on about on the blog.

12 comments

How Boots can improve its customer journey from search to checkout

In which we take a look at the experience of searching for a product, clicking-through to an ecommerce store and purchasing the item, all from a customer’s point of view.

Much like previous investigations on UK retailers John Lewis and Halfords this explores the customer journey in a nutshell, looking at visibility, relevancy, ease-of-use and speed of experience.

Here we'll be taking a look at Boots, and making suggestions on how it can improve the customer experience and perhaps increase conversion.

1 comment

Thorntons vs. Hotel Chocolat: user experience comparison

“Come with me, and you'll be, in a world of pure imagination...”

I have to stop there as I don’t want Paramount Pictures or the estate of Roald Dahl to sue us.

Instead I’ll pepper the content of this article with only the very subtlest of references to Willy Wonka and the Chocolate in the hope that nobody notices.

7 comments

Ikea: the customer journey from search to checkout and beyond

In which we take a look at the experience of searching for a product, clicking-through to an ecommerce store and purchasing the item, all from a customer’s point of view.

Much like previous investigations on retailers Apple and John Lewis this explores the customer journey in a nutshell, looking at paid search visibility, ad relevancy and the speed and ease of the ecommerce user experience.

This week: Ikea.

7 comments

Customer journey from search to checkout: Christmas jumper special

This was going to be a rigorous test of another specific UK fashion retailer’s paid search strategy, through to landing page and eventually checkout. Essentially a complete ecommerce journey from the customer’s point of view.

But then I was bombarded with LED festooned Christmas tree jumpers, wool sweaters featuring Santa with a fake wobbly Santa belly and pullovers with Rudolph’s glowing red nose and things went dramatically off-course.

4 comments

Apple: the customer journey from search to checkout

In which we take a look at the experience of searching for a product, clicking-through to an ecommerce store and purchasing the item, all from a customer’s point of view.

Much like previous investigations on UK retailers John Lewis and Halfords this explores the customer journey in a nutshell, looking at visibility, relevancy, ease-of-use and speed of experience.

5 comments

John Lewis: the customer journey from search to checkout

In which we take a look at the experience of using John Lewis from a customer point of view.

Meaning this won’t be a robust test of the ecommerce site’s search functionality, or the quality of its mega-navs, or the persuasiveness of its homepage. 

Instead this will involve searching for an item on Google, clicking on the most attractive result, testing the relevancy and helpfulness of its landing page and seeing how quick and easy it is to make a purchase. The customer journey in a nutshell. 

7 comments

Halfords: the customer journey from search to checkout

Following the relaunch of its ecommerce site at the end of 2013, Halfords online sales have risen 13.7% from the same time last year.

As reported in Internet Retailing last week, Halfords’ online sales represented 12.2% of its total retail sales. Conversion rates have risen by 19% and 92% of online orders were collected in store through its click and collect service.

Impressive figures that certainly position Halfords as a successful multichannel retailer, but what makes the Halfords online experience particularly conducive to improving its revenue?

Recently we’ve featured Halfords in various articles related to ecommerce - social customer service, guest checkouts click and collect - and to be honest this retailer hasn’t come out particularly well.

5 comments
B&Q Homepage

What users think of B&Q's new responsive site

Last month, B&Q unveiled a new responsive website, as part of a £60m redesign of its website and backend systems. 

The new site was reviewed by David Moth earlier this month and to follow this up we decided to get some feedback by asking users to test the site, using whatusersdo.

A mix of desktop, mobile and tablet users were asked to perform two tasks on the site. The first was a targeted shop to find internal door handles and go through the purchase process up until payment.

As the new site prominently features sections titled ‘Inspiration’ and ‘Projects’, the second was to gather ideas for updating a room of their choice.  

So what did the users think of the site? 

2 comments