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Posts tagged with Ad Networks

Is Apple's iAd dying a slow death?

When Steve Jobs introduced Apple's mobile advertising network, iAd, to the world, he effectively said it would be a game-changer for mobile advertising. Although some of us were skeptical, who would bet against him?

A year later, it appears that the skepticism was well-placed. iAd is, according to a new report by Bloomberg, floundering.


Apple starts squeezing pay-per-install apps

The numbers leave no doubt: when it comes to buying mobile apps, consumers feel far more comfortable handing their money over to Apple via the App Store.

A big reason for that is Apple's app approval process, which, love it or hate it, arguably provides a much greater level of quality assurance than is found in competing app stores, such as Google's Android Market.

But despite Apple's often opaque approach to App Store rules, the iPhone developer ecosystem isn't exactly squeaky clean...


Oh no! Is social the next display?

When you think of social media marketing, the words and phrases 'personalized', 'one-to-one', 'integrated' and 'user-generated' probably come to mind. But will it still be that way in a few years' time?

Not if a startup called Adaptly has its way.


Why does the LSE website have advertising?

As one might imagine, running a stock exchange is a fairly profitable business. Case in point: the London Stock Exchange (LSE), which earns over $100m a year in profit running one of the world's most recognizable equities markets.

Most of that profit is, of course, derived from the operations of markets and ancillary market services, such as the distribution of stock information. Yet if you go to the LSE website, you might notice that the exchange has no qualms about making a little bit extra on the side through display advertising.


OpenX targets big advertisers with OpenX Enterprise

OpenX became a player in the ad serving market by offering free and open-source versions of its ad serving technology.

But the online ad market is growing in sophistication, and larger advertisers are increasingly buying ads from a wider variety of sources, such as DSPs.

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Google, Mozilla jump on the Do Not Track bandwagon

The U.S. Federal Trade Commission doesn't think advertisers are doing enough to respect the privacy of consumers online, so it recently proposed the creation of a Do Not Track system for the web that would give consumers the ability to opt out of ad tracking.

There's just one big challenge: making that happen technically.

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Is online advertising really failing content?

Online content may be sexy, but even on the internet, turning a profit as a publisher isn't always easy, particularly if you rely on ad revenue to pay the bills. After all, today's advertising market has come a long way since the 1990s.

Advertisers have a seemingly unlimited array of advertising options, and the proliferation of ad networks and technologies such as retargeting mean that many publishers have seen their CPMs decline.

According to
an AdAge opinion piece by Tom Hespos, who runs a digital marketing firm, advertising is failing publishers.


Prominent ad bidders, buyers unite to create less marketplace confusion. But will it really help?

confused at computerHere’s a quick quiz. What’s the difference between a demand-side platform (DSP) and a real-time bidding (RTB) platform? Can media buyers get the same results from both? Which is more beneficial for publishers? What about yield optimization vs. data optimization?

Dozens of startups claim to answer those questions, but there’s really no way for publishers or media buyers to differentiate. Some of the most prominent ad bidding, buying and optimization firms have banded together to help clear up some of the confusion.

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Five ways publishers lose ad revenue

Despite the fact that paid content and premium services are back in fashion today, a significant number of online publishers still rely wholly or partially on advertising revenue.

Yet many of them shoot themselves in the foot by engaging in behavior that limits their potential to generate ad revenue instead of boosting it.


Publishers beware: audience targeting is not your friend

According to the 2010 Display Advertising Study conducted by Advertiser Perceptions on behalf of Collective Media, the number of advertisers planning to increase their spend this year on site-specific ad buys is greater than the number planning to increase their spend on ad networks.

The study, which was based on interviews with 420 advertisers, found that nearly half of the advertisers interviewed planned to spend more money this year with "spending increases limited to vertical content and video sites". While ad networks are also set to be the recipients of greater spending, the number was closer to a third of respondents.


OPA: Advertisers shouldn't forget about content when going after audience

Publishers are constantly focused on producing original content. And the motivation goes beyond simply drawing in more viewers. According to a new study from the Online Publishers Association, ads perform better surrounded by original content relevant to the brand.

For OPA's purposes, that means that ads on its partner sites perform better than ads on both portals and ad networks. The group found that as much as advertisers focus on reaching the right audience, advertising to that group in the right environment is key.


Yahoo throws in another towel

Yahoo has been forced to throw in the towel quite a few times over the years. From search to music to travel, getting out of markets may arguably be the one thing Yahoo still does well.

And the list of markets Yahoo gets out of continues to grow. Yahoo's latest shuttering: its AdSense-like ad network, Yahoo Publisher Network (YPN).