{{ searchResult.published_at | date:'d MMMM yyyy' }}

Loading ...
Loading ...

Enter a search term such as “mobile analytics” or browse our content using the filters above.


That’s not only a poor Scrabble score but we also couldn’t find any results matching “”.
Check your spelling or try broadening your search.


Sorry about this, there is a problem with our search at the moment.
Please try again later.

Author: Todd Ruback

Todd Ruback
eu flag

Brexit and the Digital Single Market: Three ways forward

Now that the dust has begun to settle from the UK’s Brexit referendum, I am seeing more and more measured articles discussing a number of vexing issues, including its impact on data protection legislation.

While I am not an EU attorney, I am a Chief Privacy Officer at a US based technology company and a privacy wonk, so I want to throw my unsolicited thoughts into the mix.


EU data laws: An update on GDPR & Privacy Shield

I cannot remember a time when privacy was as relevant as it is right now.

Across the EU and US, privacy has morphed from an abstract legalese concept to a kitchen table issue.


Four key factors businesses need to know about privacy in 2016

While enterprises are racing to deploy new tech that will drive revenue through uses of data, they must consider these latest technologies within the context of the EU’s new data protection law, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

Here are four key factors that businesses need to know about privacy in 2016:


2015 was the year of cyber attacks & privacy debates. What will 2016 bring?

If 2014 was the year of the data breach – as I predicted two years ago – then 2015 was the year that privacy and security simultaneously became both a kitchen table issue and a national policy issue.

In the US and EU we’ve seen breathtaking events that impact both.


Safe Harbor 2.0? An update on EU Privacy Law

This is a unique moment in the privacy and data protection world.

On October 6 the European Court of Justice – the highest court in the EU – judicially invalidated our most popular data transfer mechanism, the US Safe Harbor Program that allowed organisations to transfer personal data from the EU to US companies.


The state of online privacy

Today’s digital landscape is changing at breathtaking speed and is having a profound impact on the way we live our daily lives.

It’s hard to believe that online banking has only been around for a few years; and it’s almost quaint to think that I used to actually go to my bank to deposit a check.

Just last week, I lectured our plumber for not accepting credit cards on his phone. Don’t even get me started on my daily addiction to Uber. 


Privacy practices: the should and must of online transparency

Data collection is exploding across the internet, and for good reason. Whether you’re a Google, Facebook or small online advertising network, the more data you have the better.

You can slice it, dice it, repackage it, and - using predictive analysis - build accurate profiles to serve users with precise interest based adverts.

It drives down costs and the digital advertising industry, with their insatiable thirst for data, is booming. In just the first half of 2013, US revenue from online advertising in the US alone totalled approximately $20bn.