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Author: Mihkel Jäätma

Mihkel Jäätma

Realeyes was built to serve growing demand for efficient digital design with help of leading edge eye-tracking technology.

UK public sector websites have room for improvement

Paying council tax can hardly ever be a pleasant experience. Are UK council websites doing their part to make this process as smooth as possible?

In order to find out, Realeyes ran a test with 54 tax-payers, asking them to pay their council tax online on 6 different council sites. All participants were eye-tracked to gain objective measures about the user experience during the tax payment process. The study identified both good and poor design elements, wide ranging performance differences between councils and 'banner blindness' on some navigational items.


Is your design clear or confusing? Eye-tracking can tell

Websites that have strongly invested in building traffic should be able to capture and focus people’s attention once they arrive.

However, eye-tracking analysis shows that this is not always the case.


High street retailers: menus make a big difference

Home pages for high street retailers may initially come across as similar, but their actual performance differs strongly due to the design of the navigation menus.


Argos beats competition with user-friendly web design

Everyone knows clear and easy to use design is important for web sites and pays well to have in the competitive online environment. How exactly to achieve that goal and how to measure the user friendliness of your web design is often much less clear...

1 comment

Eye-tracking 2.0: it's about users, not science

Eye-tracking has been used in web design for many years. However, the widespread preconception is that it takes PhD skilled technicians - plus long consulting hours - to make any sense or use of people’s eye gaze data.

The value from eye-tracking has been directly related to consultancy skills, but shouldn’t it be more about real users?


Generating ROI from eye-tracking

The web is a tough place to sell services. Results are quite easily measured and people will only buy things that are clearly worth their money.

Can eye-tracking stand that test?