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Author: Michelle Hill


Content marketing the Google Hummingbird way

While Hummingbird has been much discussed, not many people understand it yet, or appreciate its benefits because it isn't an obvious feature of Google search. If you want to try it, go to Google on your smartphone and click on the microphone to activate a voice search.

For a bit of fun, say 'Tottenham Hotspur'. Google will search for the greatest team in the world (guest opinion - Ed), and then read out an up to date fact, perhaps the latest result and information about the next match.

Next, click the microphone again and ask a related question, such as 'how old are they?' Google will then show you the Wikipedia information about the club. Ask another question, such as 'where do they play?' and Google will show you information about White Hart Lane.

So, that is Hummingbird in a nutshell - a clever way of linking queries so that, instead of starting each search from scratch, Google can show you more pertinent information related to your previous search.


Fact. Creating more content gets results

As a content marketing agency, we are always telling people what a vital role content plays in driving all elements of your digital marketing, be it social media, email marketing, SEO etc.

The good thing is that most people get this now. We seem to have moved past the educational phase with more and more companies publishing fresh content on their websites on a regular basis. 

What we wanted to demonstrate, however, was the significant impact that an increase in content output (that is still high quality and original) can have on some of the key digital marketing metrics, such as website traffic, search engine rankings and social media reach. 


How to measure brand awareness on Twitter

Following my previous post How to measure brand awareness on Facebook, this week we take a look at Twitter.

Unlike Facebook, there isn’t a built-in analysis tool that does it for you (if you want sparkly graphs and the like then you can always use a social media management tool) but there are a few metrics that you can track yourself to get a feel for your brand awareness levels.


How to measure brand awareness on Facebook

“How do I measure social media?” is one of the most frequent questions I get asked whenever I give social media seminars.

However, it is difficult to give someone a one-size-fits-all answer as it largely depends on what you want to measure, and what you want to measure largely depends on your wider objectives in the first place.

With this in mind, I thought I’d put together a series of articles where each week I take a particular objective and offer some guidance on how to measure it.

I’m going to kick off with brand awareness – this week focusing solely on Facebook so as not to make the articles too long.