{{ searchResult.published_at | date:'d MMMM yyyy' }}

Loading ...
Loading ...

Enter a search term such as “mobile analytics” or browse our content using the filters above.


That’s not only a poor Scrabble score but we also couldn’t find any results matching “”.
Check your spelling or try broadening your search.


Sorry about this, there is a problem with our search at the moment.
Please try again later.

Author: Chris Lake

Chris Lake

Chris Lake is CEO at EmpiricalProof, and former Director of Content at Econsultancy.

Why is checkout abandonment still linked to nasty delivery surprises?

A new month, a new checkout abandonment survey hits the inbox. Here’s the number one cause of checkout abandonment: unacceptable delivery costs. What is this madness?

The study, by eDigitalResearch and IMRG, found that 77% of online shoppers have abandoned their basket in the past year, with 53% citing unacceptably high delivery costs as the main reason for bailing out.

Already, alarm bells are ringing. Many years ago we published some best practice research on conversion rate optimisation, and one of our key recommendations was to avoid sending people into the checkout area too early. Before they enter, they should have all of the key facts. That means delivery information, among other things.

Yet this latest checkout abandonment study found that 26% of shoppers placed an item in their basket just ‘to check delivery costs’. 


Our blog now exceeds 1m monthly page views, but does it generate ROI?

Hearty congratulations are in order in light of a big milestone that the Econsultancy blog team has reached, having for the first time surpassed 1m page impressions in a calendar month. Not bad for a niche B2B publishing operation! 

That said, we don’t create content simply to generate page views. The blog team contributes so much more to our business. I shall explain why.

A recent study found that only about a third of Fortune 500 companies maintain a blog, a statistic that I find perplexing, so I thought this might be a good time to remind ourselves – and you, dear reader – of why we blog, and what it’s doing for us.


16 ultra-creative CVs / interactive résumés that catch the eye

Pretty much everybody has created a CV / résumé at some stage in their life. As with most forms of content I think the key is to establish a tone of voice, and try to stand out from the surrounding noise.

I always used to put ‘vinyl junkie’ in the ‘interests’ section on my CV, which always worked a treat in interviews regardless of the role. People would ask me about my passion for music. I’d return the serve by asking the interviewer the same thing. These things can help to break any ice, and I think you should habitually ask plenty of questions in interviews, for all sorts of reasons.

Nowadays there are more opportunities than ever to attract the right kind of attention, and creative professionals in particular can go the extra mile to make an impression. I thought I’d collect a bunch of examples, which may inspire you to do something different.


New Twitter stats: talking is way more popular than sharing links

I thought I'd share a recent study into Twitter usage habits, conducted by Carolin Gerlitz and Bernhard Rieder. I missed this back in May, when it was first released, so apologies if you've already seen it.

The findings are significantly different to an older study from 2010 by a Microsoft team (Boyd, Golder and Lotan). This may be due to a different - arguably more robust - sampling method, using the Twitter Streaming API. Or, it may be that usage habits have evolved in the intervening three years. 

The full research is available here. It is a rather dense read, though a rewarding one. For those of you with TL;DR syndrome I have extracted some highlights.


Web design eye-candy: 24 ultra-colourful user interfaces

Much has been written about the use of colour in web design. Back in the day there were stark warnings. Pick as few as possible, seemed to be the general advice, and be sensible about your choices.

I covered the main points when I wrote about colour and web design five years ago. A lot of that advice still stands up but there has been a definite shift, and nowadays it seems that more and more designers are embracing colour like never before. The polychromatic web is upon us!

The combination of flat design and blocks of saturated colour is certainly a winning combination from where I’m sitting. It's a trend that is perhaps underpinned by the growing number of devices with retina screens in circulation.

A strong, clever use of colour can be great for branded web experiences, web apps of various flavours, and agency websites. That said, I’m not fully convinced that this design trend is ideal for retailers with hundreds or thousands of product pictures, as too much colour can be overpowering, but no doubt there are some good examples out in the wild.

So then, here are 24 websites and apps that are not remotely afraid of colour. See what you make of them, and be sure to share your views in the comments area below!


16 alternative lorem ipsum generators to spice up your filler text

If you've ever wireframed webpages then you might have found the need to use some dummy text. Traditionally that meant searching for 'lorem ipsum' on Google and copying and pasting a bunch of Latin. 

Nowadays, we have a few more options. I have collected some lorem ipsum variants for you to use the next time you need some placeholder text.

Choose your weapon wisely! And be warned, some of these tools are a little sweary, or non-PC, so if you're easily offended I suggest you stick to using Latin.



16 drop-dead gorgeous examples of mobile design inspiration

Mobile apps and responsive websites are looking - and working - better than ever, as designers come to terms with the parameters involved. Smaller screens, it seems, do not necessarily make for poorer experiences. 

If anything, the restrictions of mobile devices are focusing the minds of designers, which is always a good thing. It seems to me that the very best designs really stand out, and do a great job of understanding user behaviour on smaller devices.

I have collected a bunch of examples which go some way towards proving that mobile websites and apps can really look the part, while communicating functionality clearly. In most cases the screenshots link to portfolios, so do click on them.

I haven’t tested all of these apps, not least because a few of them are design concepts, but I think they all show that mobile design can be very, very pretty indeed. If the user experience mirrors design (and it doesn’t always!) then presumably these would all work well.


25 ways to boost employee satisfaction levels and staff retention

In a recent breakfast briefing on digital transformation we discussed staff retention, which remains one of the very biggest issues faced by modern businesses, and is a particular problem within digital teams.

People choose to leave companies for all sorts of reasons. Compensation and career progression concerns are typically at top of the list of reasons to bail out, but there are plenty of underlying issues that affect job satisfaction.

Sometimes the smallest things can have a disproportionate impact on how people feel about where they work. These minor beefs can push people over the edge if left unchecked.


What does a perfect agile marketing strategy look like?

A few months ago I compiled a list of 26 wonderful agile marketing campaigns, as there are some serious wins to be had for brands that can act fast. 

But what does it take to react quickly? 

Good timing is everything in comedy, in sport, in fashion, in cooking, and in business. Wait too long and you’ve missed your moment, but there’s a very sweet spot to hit if you get it right. As Anna Wintour says:

It’s always about timing. If it’s too soon, no one understands. If it’s too late, everyone’s forgotten.

Vogue’s editor in chief could have so easily been talking about agile marketing, which requires superlative timing. How are you supposed to win the earned media game if you sit around twiddling thumbs, or don’t have the right set up to make things happen quickly?

With this in mind, I thought I’d outline the key agile marketing success factors, and to try to figure out what kind of team structure and processes need to be put in place.

HTML5 / CSS3 logos

14 creative HTML5 websites built for digital agencies

If you run a digital agency, especially one that designs and builds websites, then what better way of showing off your talents than to build a wonderful website for your own company?

In the past couple of years many agencies have rebuilt and relaunched their websites using HTML5 and CSS3. The results can be eye-opening, highly engaging, and built to work on all kinds of devices.

It's not all good news though. Sometimes the use of HTML5 can be downright annoying: just because you can do something doesn't mean you should. Does it matter that some of these websites take half a minute to load? Personally I think fast loading times really matter, but I've heard arguments that people are prepared to wait for certain types of website. You can decide for yourself. 

At any rate, there is plenty to admire here, and perhaps there is an acceptable trade off between optimal usability and the overall user / brand experience. Certainly it's always interesting to watch web design evolve, and agencies are naturally inclined to push the boundaries.

The following examples show what can be achieved, and mercifully not all of them are addicted to loading icons. Tuck in and see what you think.


Pre-roll video ads: is it any wonder why we hate them?

Is there anybody on the planet who actually enjoys pre-roll video advertising? Research has shown that 94% of people skip pre-roll ads, though I can't believe the number is that low (presumably the other 6% are masochists). 

Pre-roll ads are as loathed as pop-ups, which studies found to be damaging to both advertiser and publisher. I imagine that the same applies to pre-rolls. Have you ever watched one and wanted to buy the product or service that's being (badly) pitched to you?  

You have to wonder why they're so popular. Certainly the YouTube experience has considerably worsened since it started putting pre-rolls on a far wider range of ads, and I for one would pay a small fee to have them permanently removed.

Why do pre-roll ads suck so badly? Partly it's the interruption, which is often a lot longer than five seconds, and partly it's because the creative tends to be beyond stupid, but there are plenty of other reasons.  

The following quotes and videos reflect all that is wrong with the pre-roll format. If you're the kind of person who likes to snuggle up to Satan by commissioning pre-rolls then you might want to take some notes.


30+ powerful adjectives and verbs for eye-catching headlines

It has been a long-standing belief of mine that writers need to create headlines that sell, in order to persuade people to click. 

A descriptive headline isn’t good enough, despite what the SEO Class Of 2006 might tell you, and neither is a clever pun, which will no doubt horrify traditional sports journalists all over the world.

Adding a punchy or emotive word to a headline is absolutely vital to enticing that all-important click, and it can really help encourage sharing. 

This is where adjectives and verbs come into play.