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All they needed was love. Now Apple and The Beatles have kissed and made up - and it could see The Fab Four's catalogue added to iTunes.

The band's Apple Corps. label last year lost a High Court lawsuit in which it had claimed Steve Jobs' computer company had reneged on a prior agreement not to confuse matters by entering the music business using the "Apple" name.

Now, in a joint statement, the pair have announced they have agreed the terms of a new partnership:

"Under this new agreement, Apple Inc. will own all of the trademarks related to 'Apple' and will license certain of those trademarks back to Apple Corps for their continued use.

"In addition, the ongoing trademark lawsuit between the companies will end, with each party bearing its own legal costs, and Apple Inc. will continue using its name and logos on iTunes. The terms of settlement are confidential."

The new detente appears to signify an capitulation for Apple Corps. enforced by its court loss. The record label had repeatedly challenged Apple Computer's foray into the music world, but has now been left without direct ownership of its own trademark.

The Cupertino, California, tech firm had agreed to the label's 1991 demand that it not enter the music business, before it launched the iPod, iTunes and the iTunes Music Store.

At Macworld last month, Steve Jobs announced his "Apple Computer" company would henceforth be known simply as "Apple Inc.", acknowledging its diversification into the entertainment space.

Jobs said: "We love the Beatles, and it has been painful being at odds with them over these trademarks. [The resolution] should remove the potential of further disagreements in the future.”

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Published 6 February, 2007 by Robert Andrews

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