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The lovely header image I've used for this blog post is a 'Karlism'. I considered using a picture of Will Ferrell's Mugatu, but stopped short.

The world of high fashion is a strange one online. Some websites are beautiful but don't work well, some vice versa, and some hit both nails on the head.

Here, I've rounded up some little features, mostly about imagery and web design but also touching on UX. I've experimented a bit by showcasing them using Vine. Some of the imagery isn't captured particularly crisply, but you can click through from each heading, or from a static image if there is one, to explore the page in question.

I could have used screencasting to capture these elements, but Vine was quite a bit quicker and maybe it even makes me look agile?

See what you think. Visit the sites and check these things out for yourself and let me know what you think works and what doesn't.

1. Product rollovers from Hugo Boss

Mouseover effects are a great way to convey information about a product, and can aid conversion. 

2. Balenciaga heritage

A nice way of jazzing up a timeline.

3. Jimmy Choo product image carousel

This is a useful piece of design, as users can see all of the product images without having to click on each individual photo. 

4. Emotikarls

OK, not so much web design, but I had to include it. Click the pic to get the app.

emotikarls

5. Prada: enormous slideshow holder before category page

Perhaps this works well for Prada's target audience, but I would question the need to put extra steps between customers and product pages. 

6. Versace product zoom

Love the crisp way this is done on the product page, showing the zoom to the side, rather than in the same pane.

7. Vivienne Westwood simple category pages

No messing around here, just some products, with price on hover.

vivienne westwood simple category pages

8. Christian Louboutin - leave a note

This is more of a web design and is the first time I've seen this. On Louboutin product pages one can leave a note, which will stick there, presuming you don't clear your cache.

leave a note product page Christian Louboutin  

9. Louboutin simplicity of layout

Clicking between categories gives similarly simple pages of products.

10. Louis Vuitton porthole video

This is a page showcasing three personas and three accompanying bags. The copywriting on this page is worth checking out. In the words of Andrew Warren-Payne, 'I was transported to a Graham Greene novel'.

11. Prada's mix of content formats

It's a little hard to find the actual store on Prada's website, but before you do, you can enjoy content from Prada's fashion house, in text and video.

12. Karl Parfum's scrolling experience

It's not the best scrolling experience, but it feels luxe and you have to admire it for being adventurous. 

13. Karl Lagerfeld homepage of visuals

The Pinterest effect is well-documented. 

14. Jimmy Choo chunky filters

15. Jimmy Choo homepage imagery

16. DVF easy to use lookbooks

Lookbooks allow users to check out catwalk looks from the latest season. These Diane Von Furstenburg one's aren't all that snazzy but they're very easy to use and link through to the items for sale.

17. Hugo Boss - imagery in dropdown category menus

Not terribly sophisticated, but helps to liven up the dropdown menus and allows promotion of a particular collection or set of items. 

18. Gucci, too

19. But I didn’t like the Gucci generation game category pages

If you're too young, refined or exotic to have heard of the generation game, it involved a conveyor belt in the final round.

20. Balenciaga store locator

Store locators are often boring. This one is full of interesting and beautiful images of stores, and you don't have to click through to each store to enjoy them.

Ben Davis

Published 18 March, 2014 by Ben Davis @ Econsultancy

Ben Davis is a senior writer at Econsultancy. He lives in Manchester, England. You can contact him at ben.davis@econsultancy.com, follow at @herrhuld or connect via LinkedIn.

806 more posts from this author

Comments (4)

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Kenny Doucette

My favorite has to be the Vivienne Westwood, simple, but brilliant. Simplicity is genius is my eyes!

over 2 years ago

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Sukhpreet Kaur, SEO Consultant at Birdbrain Logic

Awesome! I like Jimmy Choo product image carousel. May be because of the product, I simply love the silver heels, can't take my eyes off!

over 2 years ago

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Susanne Dirks

I agree with Kenny. The simplicity of Vivienne Westwood is best. A product like that does not need gimmicks. I also love Versace's product zoom. Nearly as good as touching the material !

over 2 years ago

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Adam

Sass and Bide have launched an interactive "Google Street View" site from one of their themed photo shoots - Very unique feature!

http://freetown.sassandbide.com/

over 2 years ago

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