{{ searchResult.published_at | date:'d MMMM yyyy' }}

Loading ...
Loading ...

Enter a search term such as “mobile analytics” or browse our content using the filters above.

No_results

That’s not only a poor Scrabble score but we also couldn’t find any results matching “”.
Check your spelling or try broadening your search.

Logo_distressed

Sorry about this, there is a problem with our search at the moment.
Please try again later.

Clothing retailer Threadless has unveiled a new iPhone app, giving its customers another way to shop and interact with the brand.

Threadless is a community website that specialises in unique designs for t-shirts, hoodies and other items. It is built around social media and allows users to follow their favourite designers, submit their own ideas, and vote for designs that they want the website to sell.

Alongside the standard ecommerce functions, the app includes a voting tool so users can rate new designs and a never-ending feed of original products.

Read on to find out what I thought of the app, or for more information on Threadless read our blog posts looking at how it uses welcome emails and online video...

Navigation

As one might expect from Threadless the app looks fantastic both in terms of the layout and the quality of the imagery.

The homepage displays a grid featuring colourful images of every Threadless design, so you can happily scroll down for ages perusing the t-shirts and hoodies that are on offer.

Users can also filter by product type by accessing the hamburger menu or find a specific item using the search tool.

                      

Along the bottom of the screen there are further icons that allow you to access your account details or shopping cart, vote for products you like, or view the most recent social activity on the site.

It’s all very simple and easy to use, which is exactly what I want from a mobile app.

Product pages

Threadless prints its designs on a range of items so the product pages allow users to view what the print will look like on a hoodie, t-shirt or other accessories.

The product pages have been stripped down to the bare essentials, with little more than images, a price and a call-to-action.

Adding an item to your cart is incredibly user-friendly. Once you’ve selected the size a pink ‘Add to Cart’ CTA pops up, leaving shoppers in no doubt as to the next stage of their journey.

                      

Checkout

When you hit the ‘Cart’ icon you’re given the choice of the normal checkout or PayPal, which is a useful option for mobile shoppers who don’t want to bother entering card details.

That said, data from Poq Studio shows that a majority of app users are repeat customers so they could just as easily store their payment details with Threadless rather than PayPal.

When you get to the checkout Threadless doesn’t ask for existing account details as users are expected to sign in before adding items to their basket. This is a great way of reducing barriers to purchase, but also meant that I had to exit the checkout in order to sign in to my existing account.

                      

Even so, the checkout for new customers is very slick and keeps form filling to a minimum. There are just three screens to get through before a purchase is complete.

Alas the app wouldn’t actually let me log in and kept coming back with an error message, though it obviously worked on some level as the cat t-shirt that I was trying to buy appeared in my shopping basket on the desktop site.

In conclusion...

Threadless has successfully created an app that combines an excellent UX with gorgeous imagery.

It’s a very simple app, but then Threadless has a limited range of products albeit with a huge number of designs to choose from.

This means that it’s fun and easy to use, and will likely lead to an increase in loyalty and repeat purchases from the company’s existing customer base.

Another important factor is that the app's design is consistent with the desktop site so it fits with the overall brand experience that one expects from Threadless.

Overall I’m extremely impressed with the app and look forward to the Android version.

David Moth

Published 12 March, 2014 by David Moth @ Econsultancy

David Moth is Editor and Head of Social at Econsultancy. You can follow him on Twitter or connect via Google+ and LinkedIn

1676 more posts from this author

Comments (10)

Comment
No-profile-pic
Save or Cancel
Avatar-blank-50x50

Billy

Thanks for the wonderful review of our app David!

about 2 years ago

David Moth

David Moth, Editor & Head of Social at EconsultancyStaff

No problem. Great work!

about 2 years ago

Mike Hann

Mike Hann, Director at Poq Studio

Great UI - hats off.

about 2 years ago

Avatar-blank-50x50

Kyle

What Billy said! Thanks for all the kind words and such a thorough review of our app!

about 2 years ago

Avatar-blank-50x50

Tony Richardson

Slow news day? In my opinion shopping apps are dead:

1) responsive sites are good if not better and catching up to all functionalities of what an app can do.
2) despite the figures you've quoted apps have the lowest conversion rate. Mobile purchases happen but on mobile sites rather than on app!

If you are a retailer, don't bother with an app. Instead invest on a great responsive site which will work across all devices.

Tony

about 2 years ago

David Moth

David Moth, Editor & Head of Social at EconsultancyStaff

Hi Tony, thanks for your comment. Econsultancy is an ecommerce and digital marketing blog, and as part of that we frequently review mobile commerce apps, so I don't really get your point about it being a slow news day.

Regarding your other point about mobile apps, I don't think it's a straight choice between having either a responsive site or an app. I agree that businesses should be looking to build responsive sites, but apps are also a useful option for retailers that have a loyal customer base as it makes it easier for people to quickly log on and make a purchase or browse product options.

about 2 years ago

Mike Hann

Mike Hann, Director at Poq Studio

Interesting opinion Tony.

As Econsultancy often says, it's not an 'either or' decision with responsive sites and apps; they serve different purposes and customer segments. Threadless already have a great responsive site, but compare the mobile web experience on iPhone to their native app.

On your second point, where is your data coming from? Check out this post which may change your opinion: https://econsultancy.com/blog/64435-nine-excellent-retail-apps-that-help-to-foster-customer-loyalty

about 2 years ago

Avatar-blank-50x50

Tony Richardson

@David Moth I've read many illuminating posts here on econsultancy. I know a filler post when I see it. This post essentially says: company x has released an app. WOW!

I see you have tested the app but don't really go below the surface. I'm paraphrasing here: fun and easy to use..... And will likely to lead to repeat purchases, You never go on to develop your thoughts and expand more. Instead you sprinkle more weak points.... App is consistent with brands overall imagery.

You can and have written better.

@mike obviously your views are biased. I read the post you linked to and have offered my thoughts there.

about 2 years ago

David Moth

David Moth, Editor & Head of Social at EconsultancyStaff

@Tony, I'm both pleased that you've read a lot of useful posts on Econsultancy and disappointed that you view this as filler. We write a lot of app and website reviews with the aim of highlighting decent examples for people to aspire to and also to give constructive criticism where the UX falls short (in our opinion).

As bloggers we need to strike a balance between writing in-depth analysis of apps while also being concise so that people will hopefully read the entire article. I felt I'd addressed all the aspects that made this an excellent app without labouring any of the points, though I will accept your point that I could have perhaps been more descriptive at times.

Regarding your statement that I make weak points - I didn't say the app is consistent with the brand's overall imagery, I said it was consistent with the overall design of the website so maintained a consistent brand experience. I feel this is actually quite an important point, as it's often the case that apps don't meet the standards that we expect from the companies that created them and therefore damage the overall brand experience.

about 2 years ago

Avatar-blank-50x50

Laura | Taggr

You can't knock how much shopping apps are coming on. In a lot of cases the order journey is now smoother in the app than on the desktop version!

about 2 years ago

Comment
No-profile-pic
Save or Cancel
Daily_pulse_signup_wide

Enjoying this article?

Get more just like this, delivered to your inbox.

Keep up to date with the latest analysis, inspiration and learning from the Econsultancy blog with our free Daily Pulse newsletter. Each weekday, you ll receive a hand-picked digest of the latest and greatest articles, as well as snippets of new market data, best practice guides and trends research.