{{ searchResult.published_at | date:'d MMMM yyyy' }}

Loading ...
Loading ...

Enter a search term such as “mobile analytics” or browse our content using the filters above.


That’s not only a poor Scrabble score but we also couldn’t find any results matching “”.
Check your spelling or try broadening your search.


Sorry about this, there is a problem with our search at the moment.
Please try again later.

In the endlessly self-referential world of Twitter, the company made its own headlines today with the rollout of Twitter Lists. The microblogging service has now enabled about 50% of Twitter accounts with the functionality, which is slowly trending on the site.

Twitterers, blogs and news sites are atwitter with the news, but in order for Lists to serve its purpose, it needs to bring in more users and get current followers more addicted to tweeting. Can functionality like Lists turn the tide for Twitter?

A small subset of users read and write most of the updates on Twitter. But the average user isn't active at all. If Twitter wants to achieve mainstream success, or get close to the business quasi-competitor Facebook is doing, it needs to increase its user base and keep its current followers coming back for more. Some people think that's not going to happen.

According to Hitwise this week, Facebook is currently leaving Twitter in the dust. It's no surprise that the fledgling service can't compete with Facebook's established traffic, but if it is losing relevance, that is a big problem.

And Hitwise's Kim-Mai Cutler thinks they are. They've found that while Facebook's popularity continues to grow, Twitter's web traffic has been declining over the last six months.

Those numbers are far from definitive, considering that many twitterers use moblie apps to access the service, but it could be indicative of a trend. And any loss of stickiness is a problem for Twitter.

Twitter co-founder Ev Williams touched on his site's traffic numbers at last week’s Web 2.0 Summit in San Francisco:

“It’s growing in some areas and slowing in others. We’re seeing growth internationally and in mobile. [Traffic] is not a very good gauge. Our U.S. Twitter.com traffic has probably slowed temporarily. There are some things we’re launching that will pick that back up.”

And that's part of where Lists come in. Twitter is a niche service — with average users that are completely unengaged. But for Twitter to continue to grow, it needs to become a neccessity in the daily lives of its users.

If Twitter can help its users sift the wheat from the chaff of pertinent news, it can greatly increase its utility. Services like Tweetdeck have already been doing this for some users, but putting the functionality directly intoTwitter's interface is a big step forward.

With half of Twitter users getting List functionality today, the term "Twitter Lists" is on track to become the top trending item on Twitter today. And Lists have received plenty of coverage. Multitudes of users are at work creating and sharing lists, and Listorious already exists to help sift through them all.*

Meanwhile, Tech blogger Robert Scoble announced today that he's done with RSS after getting access to the new service. Twitter has already caused many users to take a break from their news feeds, and if Lists helps cut the chord, that would be great for the microblogging service.

If Twitter can become a one-stop shop for online news and information, it will become increasingly valuable to anyone surfing the web. But as it grows in popularity, the clutter grows with it. And while just getting headlines on Twitter may be easier than reading through the cumbersome layout of many RSS readers, its functionality is not to deliver the news.

Part of the value in tweets is their personalized nature. While lists can help sort out what people are eating for lunch, the on the fly nature of the service means that Twitter will never be clutter free. Because of that, lists have the potential to get as disjointed as many RSS feeds have become for users. But that doesn't mean Twitter Lists can't be useful. At least until something better comes along for users.

*List services only work for Twitter users who have Lists enabled.

Images: Twitter, HitWise

Meghan Keane

Published 29 October, 2009 by Meghan Keane

Based in New York, Meghan Keane is US Editor of Econsultancy. You can follow her on Twitter: @keanesian.

721 more posts from this author

Comments (5)

Kevin Charlton

Kevin Charlton, Head of Innovation at fuse8

Love the new feature! For those who follow lots of people it's a god send!

almost 7 years ago



I really believe in Lists. It is a must have for removing the clutter. If Twitter applications such as Echofon on iPhone and others come along supporting this, it's a killer!

almost 7 years ago


Anthony Hereld

Twitter is a bit behind the 8-ball.  Platforms like TweetDeck have been doing basically the same thing for awhile now.

I was part of the 50% and have made some lists.  It does keep the stream more organized, but it won't keep me from using TweetDeck, which still enhances the Twitter experience.

almost 7 years ago


Shefali Nagdev

Twitter’s increasing popularity is for the world to see. Losing out to Facebook until now, the introduction of Lists might just do the trick to turn the tide in the favour of Twitter. This does seem a little early for predictions though.  

almost 7 years ago



Twitter lists is much more important than it looks on the surface. Twitter lists may mark the first time that search engines can index PEOPLE. Love your take on this post: http://www.tourismkeys.ca/blog/2009/10/tagging-people-keywords-search-engines/

almost 7 years ago

Save or Cancel

Enjoying this article?

Get more just like this, delivered to your inbox.

Keep up to date with the latest analysis, inspiration and learning from the Econsultancy blog with our free Daily Pulse newsletter. Each weekday, you ll receive a hand-picked digest of the latest and greatest articles, as well as snippets of new market data, best practice guides and trends research.