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Google boss Eric Schmidt gave the Tories a glimpse of the internet's future today, including a suggestion for the party restructure itself to become more creative.

In a speech at the Tory conference, Schmidt said party leader and blogger David Cameron should adopt the search giant's internal model.

"We run Google in this bizarre way which we call 70-20-10. Seventy percent of our resources are applied to our core business, 20% on our adjacent businesses and 10% on new and innovative things that nobody could possibly ever have thought of," he said. 

"I was thinking Mr Cameron and the leadership could say 70% could work on our core activities, 20% could work on our adjacent activities, and 10% of you are in charge of inventing completely new ideas - half of which are wacko, and half of which are brilliant."

Politicians seem to be falling over themselves to be associated with Google at the moment.

Schmidt's speech comes after Tony Blair mentioned 'The Google Generation' in his conference address last week, and Cameron's talk at the search engine's Zeitgeist event earlier this year.

The Google chief went on to make some serious points about how governments need to come to terms with the web's impact on society and business, before detailing some potential future services, including "Google in an iPod" and "simultaneous translations in all languages".

He also caused some nervous laughter when saying Google's computers can already "make a pretty good guess" about the truthfulness of statements.


Published 3 October, 2006 by Richard Maven

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