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In an industry so accountable and measurable, it seems that some are using the excuse of delivering “brand awareness” to avoid the need to prove results.

Now P&G, one of the world’s largest advertisers, has spoken out for the need for change in the internet marketing industry.

In last week’s digital marketing press, Procter and Gamble called upon the industry to focus more on delivering return on investment than just the creative wow.

Head of Interactive Marketing, Emma Jenkins, commented that “creative needs to deliver” and that “business objectives need to be embraced all the way through the creative agency”.

I think this issue stems from the space that exists between the creative agency and media agency when planning a campaign. Both have significant influence on the results of a campaign, but rarely do they meet to discuss ideas and objectives at the outset.

Creative agencies are often so focused on the top half of the brief, little thought goes into how the campaign will be measured and deliver the results.

I quote Bill Bernbach on this: "All this talk of creativity has me worried. I fear lest we keep the creativity and lose the sell".

Media agencies also need to raise their game, selecting appropriate sites and placements that work for the creative, not just those that meet the required demographic.

The challenge in measuring campaign performance for FMCG brands such as P&G is that the sale is not completed online, so there is no sale conversion rate.

However, this doesn't mean its impossible to measure results. We just need to be a little more creative in our approach.

1) Rich Media interactions

Flash formats not only offer a more eye-catching creative, they also allow the measurement of user interactions from mouse-over, banner expanded, video played, dwell time and response. All of these show user engagement with the brand and campaign.

2) Clicks and landings

Often a weakness in many campaigns, develop an engaging and compelling microsite. For a brand like P&G it could contain celebrity gossip, beauty tips, further product information or even a subscription to a newsletter. A microsite not only looks great, but every click is trackable and shows user response.

3) Coupon redemption

McDonalds has proven the approach with their recent BOGOF campaign, as did Freshers last Christmas. A printable coupon, or maybe even an SMS message, to redeem in store could be an effective measure of success at point of purchase.

4) Social networking

Many products fit naturally into the social networking space, whether it be developing a forum for comment or building an application for Facebook or Myspace. Engage users by asking for reviews of products they have bought and develop free word-of-mouth advertising by recommending to friends.

5) Post-purchase follow-up

On the product itself, ask the user to visit your website for free goodies. This not only develops brand advocacy and cross sell opportunity, a cookie can be dropped on their PC allowing for highly targeted advertising to be delivered via your display placements.

Yes, branding is not as straightforward as direct sales response, but online marketing can offer a range of metrics to prove its effectiveness, if the creative and media teams get their heads together at the start.

Matthew Finch - view blog

Matthew Finch

Published 21 January, 2008 by Matthew Finch

25 more posts from this author

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Jonathan Moody

Jonathan Moody, Freelance at Language4Communications

Interesting article, Matthew, particularly the following points:

"Media agencies also need to raise their game, selecting appropriate sites and placements that work for the creative, not just those that meet the required demographic."

To do this agencies need to know the social media people are discussing these brands / products and target those with the highest influence (traffic, number of links, interactivity, originality of content & frequency of update). They can also analyse conversations to understand what these people criticise or praise

"Many products fit naturally into the social networking space, whether it be developing a forum for comment or building an application for Facebook or Myspace. Engage users by asking for reviews of products they have bought and develop free word-of-mouth advertising by recommending to friends."

Great idea - you can develop these social networks and also engage users through exisiting social media: blogs, forums, user groups, portals, microblogging...

almost 9 years ago

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Steven Herron

Matthew,
You pinpoint exactly the difficulty in dealing with multiple agencies when trying to launch and/or manage an online campaign. There are different agendas and a lot of jealousies involved that are not often the best for the client, product or service.
I especially like the quote from Emma Jenkins, "Creative has to deliver...business objectives need to be embraced all the way through the creative agency." That should be every CMO's mantra!
Your suggestions for measurement are also right on target.
Thanks

almost 9 years ago

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Steven Herron

Matthew,
You pinpoint exactly the difficulty in dealing with multiple agencies when trying to launch and/or manage an online campaign. There are different agendas and a lot of jealousies involved that are not often the best for the client, product or service.
I especially like the quote from Emma Jenkins, "Creative has to deliver...business objectives need to be embraced all the way through the creative agency." That should be every CMO's mantra!
Your suggestions for measurement are also right on target.
Thanks

almost 9 years ago

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mike ashworth

It is also possible to watch what is being saif about your Brand online as you go about your campaign

Check out this great tool called brandwatch developed by a firm in the UK called Magpie www.magpie.net

Brandwatch is a tool that measures online brand strength.

Brandwatch crawls the web 24/7 for conversations taking place in blogs, forums and newsgroups. Each day, it tracks hundreds of brands in over 40 industries and records relevant brand mentions each day on over 300,000 websites including most of the major forum, blog and news sites.

Brandwatch extracts the topics talked about, so helping you understand what is driving the discussion taking place.

Finally each mention is automatically analyzed by sophisticated software that categorizes them by influence and sentiment using the latest natural language processing techniques developed by our in-house natural language experts.

The result is a body of decision making information that is incredibly powerful for a variety of applications.

Mike Ashworth
Business and Marketing Coach
Brighton and Hove, UK

almost 9 years ago

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Leon

I would also like to offer another alternative for finding out about what is said about brands online. www.sentimentmetrics.com

This service is an interactive dashboard providing information such as :
-Total buzz tracked over time
-Sentiment of mentions
-Influencers (pie chart showing the main influencers of your brand online)
-Competitive intelligence (total buzz/sentiment of each brand compared side by side)
-Top buzz (the main topics mentioned about your brand)

And lots more.

It was launched final quarter 2007, and already has several large agencies and blue chip clients.

There is a free trial, if any readers are interested.

over 8 years ago

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Frank Zweegers

Thanks for the info!

about 5 years ago

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