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It proved to be a fruitful Christmas for John Lewis, with like-for-like sales up 13% in the five weeks to December 29 compared to the same period in 2011.

And the news from its ecommerce store was even more impressive. Online sales grew almost three-times faster at 44.3% and now account for a quarter of all group sales.

In fact it reached more than £800m in annual sales through Johnlewis.com in December.

So how has John Lewis managed to pull off such a massive increase in online sales? Here’s a run down of some of the reasons behind its continued success...

1. PPC

Among the top selling gifts at Christmas were new gadgets such as e-readers and iPads.

A quick Google search shows that John Lewis has clearly spent a lot of money on PPC to ensure it secures traffic for ‘iPad’ and ‘e-reader’ search terms, and also for ‘iPod’ and ‘Smart TV’.

2. Well designed product pages

John Lewis’ product pages are by no means perfect, but they do tick several of the boxes for best practice.

For example, it has excellent product descriptions (details of the 64GB iPod Touch runs to 443 words), recommendations based on what other customers viewed, delivery costs, stock information and cross-selling of related items.

All these are excellent features that help customers to make an informed purchase decision.

On the down side though, the calls-to-action are quite small and the products I looked at only had one image, although there was a zoom function.

Furthermore, though there is the option to leave a product review very few customers have actually bothered, so John Lewis could do more to encourage people to leave reviews either by post-sales emails or by making it more prominent on the page.

3. Consistent site navigation

Not all traffic to ecommerce sites comes in through the homepage, much will arrive directly at product or category pages, so navigation should be consistent so that people can find their way around the site from wherever they happen to be. 

For most sites, this means a constant top navigation and search bar, as on John Lewis. 

4. Enclosed Checkout

By enclosing its checkout John Lewis has removed features such as navigation bars and search boxes that may distract the user from making a purchase.

The checkout screen is plain and simple, allowing the shopper to focus on the task in-hand.

5. Simple checkout process

There are six steps John Lewis’ checkout process, which could be trimmed down slightly, but even so there is very little form filling involved for either repeat or new customers, and it offers shortcuts such as a postcode lookup tool.

If you choose to create an account, the site saves your delivery and billing addresses so you need only enter your card details, meaning the checkout is completed in a couple of minutes.

That said, John Lewis should consider giving customers the option to store their card details so purchases could be made simply by using a password, similar to Amazon's one-click payment method.

6. Free delivery on orders over £50

Expensive or hidden delivery costs are a common cause of basket abandonment, so it’s important for retailers to be upfront with their charges.

John Lewis details its various costs on every product page and offers free standard delivery within five working days if the items are worth more than £50, otherwise there is a £3 charge.

For next day or Saturday delivery the costs are quite steep at £6.95, but by offering a free option for more expensive orders and a free ‘click and collect’ service John Lewis is able to cater for most customer’s needs without charging them for delivery.

7. Guest registration

Forcing customers to create an account before checking out is another common cause of basket abandonment, but John Lewis successfully avoids any mention of registration until the very end of the checkout process.

8. Alternative payments

Not all consumers are happy to enter their credit card details online, so offering alternative payments methods can be a great way to capture additional sales.

John Lewis allows shoppers to pay using nine different methods, including all major credit cards, a John Lewis or Waitrose Account Card, or PayPal.

9. Click and collect

‘Click and collect’ services that allow shoppers to buy online but pick up the product in-store have proven to be a huge success for a number of retailers.

As highlighted in our report ‘How The Internet Can Save The High Street’, 80% of UK consumers have reserved a product online for in-store collection, while 20% do this at least once a month.

Argos’ ‘Check and Reserve’ service accounted for 29% of its £819m sales in Q1 2012, while Halfords introduced a ‘Click and Collect’ service three years ago and now 86% of all its online sales are for in-store collection.

John Lewis not only offers click and collect, but also allows customers to pick up their items from around 100 Waitrose stores – a service it promoted through a virtual QR code store in Brighton in November 2011.

After ordering online, customers can pick the item up after 2pm the following day from any John Lewis or participating Waitrose store, if the order is place before 7pm the previous day.

10. It was quick to embrace mobile commerce

John Lewis launched its first mobile site back in October 2010, gaining a big headstart on a number of its competitors.

While mobile sales are likely to be a small proportion of its overall online sales, it means that shoppers can easily research product information on-the-go, which helps to increase brand awareness and also encourages people to later make a purchase on the desktop site.

The mobile site also works hand-in-hand with the click and collect service, as it means customers can make impulse purchases and pick up the item at their convenience.

11. Free Wi-Fi in-store

We’ve investigated in some detail whether retailers should offer customers free Wi-Fi in-store, and overall the benefits for the customer experience outweigh any potential negatives.

John Lewis has offered customers mobile web access since the end of 2011, and last February head of online delivery and customer experience Sean O’Connor told us that it had been a big step forward in helping customers make an informed purchase decision.

They can quickly and easily access our mobile optimised website, or use our iPhone app. Customers are free to access the whole of the web, including competitor sites to test our price commitment, however it primarily enables us to extend our John Lewis online content and services into our physical shops in a way that is convenient for them.

12. Multichannel strategy

Many businesses are still struggling to implement an effective multichannel strategy, but as long ago as September 2010 we interviewed John Lewis’ head of online Jonathon Brown about the company’s multichannel approach to retail. 

He revealed that when the business opened a new brick-and-mortar store it led to an increase in online sales from that area, and that the company was targeting click and collect customers with vouchers and offers to help drive incremental sales in-store.

John Lewis’ multichannel strategy has now evolved to include mobile apps that have in-built barcode scanners and store locators, as well as free in-store Wi-Fi, which all helps to boost brand awareness and drive sales across all customer touchpoints.

13. It started its Christmas sale early

Data from Experian shows that shoppers began searching for sales early this year, so it was important that retailers matched this need by launching their sales before Boxing Day.

On Christmas Eve and Christmas Day one in every 125 searches conducted in the UK including the word ‘sale’ or ‘sales’. The top sales search term was 'Next sale', followed by 'Debenhams sale', 'Marks and Spencer sale' and 'John Lewis sale'.

It could be that consumers were looking to buy items or just researching with an eye on heading to the shops on Boxing Day, but by having its sale live at 5pm on Christmas Eve John Lewis managed to grab a valuable headstart.

In fact, managing director Andy Street revealed that Christmas Eve was the retailer’s single busiest online shopping day ever.

14. Competitors falling by the wayside

John Lewis has benefitted this year from the problems suffered by other retailers, most notably Comet’s bankruptcy.

Technology sales at the retailer increased by just over 30% and, as we’ve seen, it has a PPC campaign that targets must-have gadgets, so some of the company’s success has probably come from increasing its market share versus its rivals.

David Moth

Published 3 January, 2013 by David Moth @ Econsultancy

David Moth is Editor and Head of Social at Econsultancy. You can follow him on Twitter or connect via Google+ and LinkedIn

1676 more posts from this author

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Andy Symonds

The most important factor you haven't mentioned in my opinion is the extra warranty and free support that John Lewis provide compared to all of their competition which really separates them in the crowded marketplace.

over 3 years ago

Jonathan Beeston

Jonathan Beeston, Director, New Product Innovation, EMEA at Media & Advertising Solutions, Adobe

Two more reasons I'd throw in:
- extended guarantees. JL offer a 2 year guarantee on iPads, for example, Apple only 1 year.
- return items to any store, which is often much more convenient than post.

over 3 years ago

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Nick Wilsdon

Hi David,

All good reasons but I'd suggest one of the key ones is their successful synergy between online/offline retail. AFAIK John Lewis store managers are accredited with sales within a local radius, so they have an incentive to push customers to purchase online. Signs about 24/7 access to shopping/home delivery through JohnLewis.com and pick-up price lables help cement this relationship (as does the 'click and collect' system the other way).

They understand that their stores can be showrooms for customers to see, feel and get advice on the products, before they order online. Other high street stores have failed to work on this relationship, resulting in them loosing the final sale to another online retailer and leaving them with the overheads.

John Lewis also understand the brand value they have created, in terms of their product support, returns policy and extended warranties. This plays an important part of their defence against online retailers competing only on price.

over 3 years ago

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Pritesh Patel

I think the guarantee is probably a very influential factor on all electrical goods. Yes, the website is a great experience et al but it's the backing of a JL guarantee that does it in my opinion.

Let's not forget that John Lewis also DON'T do cashback deals from Quidco for online purchases thus making it less attractive for those hunting for a discount.

Pay the premium price, get the reassurance of the guarantee.

over 3 years ago

dan barker

dan barker, E-Business Consultant at Dan Barker

Thanks for the post, David. Here are 3 more I noticed:

1. Trust (+ The Tax Fiasco).

John Lewis is seen as massively trustworthy. They have extended warranties on products, they have long return periods, you can get gift receipts. Basically the perception is that you never need ask any 'trust' questions buying at John Lewis.

Add the Amazon/Starbucks/etc tax stuff to that right before Christmas & I'm sure they picked up a few sales purely from people wondering who they wanted to shop with.

2. Ironing Out The Issues

If you walk around a John Lewis store, it is pretty much a department store where most problems and issues have been ironed out. Online is a similar experience.

3. Process & Execution.

If you search for 'John Lewis' on Google today, you'll see the Google+ box references the clearance, there are recent G+ posts, the homepage title tag has been updated to make sure clearance is referenced in SERPs (very simple, but nobody ever remembers to do this), the map references all of their locations & opening times, etc.

In other words, they're big, but have managed to maintain the attention to detail on all the little processes that someone with too much time on their hands would manage.

dan

over 3 years ago

dan barker

dan barker, E-Business Consultant at Dan Barker

Here's a final interesting one.

Take a look at the Google Trends graph showing search volume for "John Lewis Advert" vs searches for "Econsultancy":

http://bit.ly/jlvseconsultancy

over 3 years ago

David Moth

David Moth, Editor & Head of Social at EconsultancyStaff

@Dan, good point, I forgot about the hullabaloo around the John Lewis Christmas ads.

The warranty is obviously an important factor as well, and admittedly one that I wasn't aware of.

over 3 years ago

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Simon L

Very nicely broken down. I do also feel that you have also missed out one key factor. JL have been pushing their "never knowingly undersold" price matching policy quite substantially over the past month or so. This policy is very flexible with its conditions, apart from the fact you cannot redeem it in store. Thus forcing any sale via price matching to online or phone. I would assume that the opportunity to get the best price, coupled with JL service (I.e. free 5 year warranty on large screen TVs) has had quite a boost to their online revenue stream.

Simon

over 3 years ago

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David Quaid

Great that you listed PPC first. Why people pretend that people dont buy from search is worrying and borderline fraudulent. PPC works very well in the right hands, and PPC can impact offline and social media and can help organic traffic by learning new keywords to target ranking for.

Its very good but unfortunately, there's nothing new here at all. This might be news for many off-line retailers but this is old news to anyone else who makes a living online.

over 3 years ago

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James Aufenast

There's one reason above all others that hasn't been mentioned: service. We had great service over the Christmas period. Call backs when requested, and immediate replacement in store with a proper run-through and try out with us. It's simple, but others just don't do it.

over 3 years ago

Graham Charlton

Graham Charlton, Editor in Chief at ClickZ Global

I guess we're at about twenty reasons, which further proves Dan's third point.

John Lewis does a lot right, but it's the attention to detail that is so impressive, giving it the best possible advantage in every area.

over 3 years ago

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Depesh Mandalia, Head of Digital Marketing at Lost My Name

21. JL clearly benefited from the Ann Summers video parody :)

In all seriousness I'd also add that years of insight & optimisation play a big part in their impressive digital growth - for me they're as big a benchmark within ecommerce as Amazon have been over the years.

over 3 years ago

Guy Cookson

Guy Cookson, CMO and Co-Founder at Respond Native Advertising Platform

I will add a broad sense of trust and goodwill people have for the brand. Everything mentioned in the article is correct - these details absolutely have to be spot-on, but the brand equity is vital too.

over 3 years ago

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Darren Barber

The majority of comments and points in the article relate to consumer experience onsite, which is important.
But I am surprised (maybe not for this forum) at the lack of recognition advertising has actually played.
To summarise the importance of the TV ad and massive adspend to a one line "I forgot about the TV advert buzz" suggests this is an unbalanced understanding off communications planning from beginning to end.
I promise you without that telly ad and without outstanding creative, plus all the money pumped into newspapers and magazines their site visits would have been 20% lower and sales accordingly.
Fine to champion good ecommerce but you've got to generate the interest first before you wax on about site nav...
IMHO.

over 3 years ago

Graham Charlton

Graham Charlton, Editor in Chief at ClickZ Global

@Darren You raise an interesting point. Clearly, the ad was widely seen, but it's tricky to pin down exactly how much of an effect it had compared to some of the other factors mentioned here.

over 3 years ago

David Moth

David Moth, Editor & Head of Social at EconsultancyStaff

@Darren, I certainly made an error in overlooking the TV advert, but that doesn't mean the article isn't valid.

JL has used its knowledge and experience to ensure that it delivers an excellent online experience in order to convert the additional traffic into sales. You could create the most-talked about offline campaign in history, but if you've got a dreadful website then it's not going to convert into online sales.

over 3 years ago

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Darren barber

As I say, I appreciate a good shop as much as the next man, and enjoyed your article, but you have to get me in it first. You advertised your article, I read it.
And I hope their agencies can tell them exactly how much of an impact each variable has contributed otherwise I would suggest they consider their options.
Which was the main reason for my contribution. Weighting all the 14 points in order of effectiveness, not having advertising impact at the top is like a snowman with no carrot.

over 3 years ago

Carl Duncker

Carl Duncker, Digital Marketing Consultant at Maverick Digital Media

It's the Power of Love

over 3 years ago

Graham Charlton

Graham Charlton, Editor in Chief at ClickZ Global

@Darren The 14 reasons aren't weighted in order of effectiveness, nor is David saying that these are the only reasons for John Lewis' impressive online performance.

In part, the intention of the post was to create a debate, which is what has happened, with people chipping in with other factors.

John Lewis' online success around Xmas was based on a range of factors, of which the TV ad is one.

It's hard to tell how much of a factor the TV ad was. Clearly, it created a 'buzz' but, due to the nature of the medium, it's hard to say exactly how big a part the ad played.

I would guess that, ad or no ad, John Lewis would have done well this Xmas, precisely because it is a trusted and reliable brand which follows best practice, online and offline.

I would suggest there are many other factors beside TV ads which attract visitors to the John Lewis website and, as David points out, getting them there is one thing, converting them is another matter.

over 3 years ago

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Charles

14? John Lewis' success online has to do with the following points:
1. many decades of trust and the highest-quality retail experience, built up via the high street-only business, prior to any online business even existed.

I see this article as an opportunist piece to associate e-Consultancy (and all its admitted subject expertise) with the success of John Lewis. People pointing out on here that TV ads are significant by their absence have a good point, but, at least for the next few years, even that pales in comparison with the trust they've built up over the years before they even had a website.

over 3 years ago

dan barker

dan barker, E-Business Consultant at Dan Barker

The majority of comments and points in the article relate to human earthlings and their activity in a retail store.
But I am surprised (maybe not for this forum) at the lack of recognition of the big bang.
To summarise the importance of the big bang and massive activity at the beginning of the universe to a one line "I forgot about the big bang" suggests this is an unbalanced understanding of life on earth from beginning to end.
I promise you without the big bang, plus all the millions of years of species evolution since, their site visits would have been 20% lower and sales accordingly.
Fine to champion good ecommerce but you've got to generate the existence of a universe and intelligent life forms capable of retail purchasing before you wax on about site nav...
IMHO.

In all seriousness though. I enjoyed the post & I enjoyed the reasoned nature of the content within the post. My assumption had been advertising had been excluded (along with brand/goodwill/customer service) based on scope, rather than implying any lack of importance.

I'd love to see Darren write a similar post based on the success of 'the ad' & how he'd go about measuring its impact. It's a good, important subject, a good point (albeit somewhat negatively raised), & doesn't get spoken about enough.

over 3 years ago

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Charles

@Dan - very funny, except this was not an article about the success of human beings at retailing in general. In which case, your comments about the big bang and intelligent life would have made some sense. It was about the reasons for success at trading of a *specific* retailer, which is a little different. It's about what John Lewis did differently from other retailers in the space to capitalise on seasonal demand, that other retailers could not match. I'd have thought this is something we are all interested in, otherwise we wouldn't have clicked through. My point is similar to others on here saying that there are strong non-digital channel factors at play. If you believe you have expertise in this space then you have to be able to consider those factors in a digital environment too. I'd have thought it would be quite interesting to understand how the trust and overall experiential quality aspect of John Lewis drove its sales in these hard times as well.

over 3 years ago

dan barker

dan barker, E-Business Consultant at Dan Barker

Thanks, Charles... or should I say... DARREN BARBER?!?!?!?!??!! (I am kidding of course, as I was before)

I agree it would be interesting to talk about other factors, which is pretty much what was happening in the comments. Your comment said: "I'd have thought it would be quite interesting to understand how the trust and overall experiential quality aspect of John Lewis drove its sales in these hard times as well."

I agree, and you may have missed I'd commented earlier, rambling on about exactly that (the bit beginning "1. Trust"). There are some great comments above/below that talking about similar too.

:)

Very interesting the background on all of that too. Remember when they used not to advertise? Remember when most stores had a different individual brand name? (I still think of them as Bainbridges, or Cole Brothers).

I *think* they standardised store names to ease national advertising, though I could be wrong. And remember when they used to be closed on Mondays? And have you ever taken a look at the bonuses partners achieve? (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Lewis_Partnership#Financial_performance)

Really interesting company, and both interesting & inspirational what they've managed to achieve over the last few years. Also interesting to look at the areas they've chosen to 'standardise' and those they choose to keep unique.

over 3 years ago

Graham Charlton

Graham Charlton, Editor in Chief at ClickZ Global

@ Charles We aren't trying to opportunistically associate ourselves with the success of JL, we're just looking at what JL does well online so that others can learn the lessons. This is what we do on the blog, in our best practice reports etc.

TV ads and trust aside, JL is a great example of what retailers can do online and there are plenty of other retailers which could learn a thing or two.

Also, we're not dismissing the importance of the trust and reputation that JL has built up over the years, it's just that it's impossible for other brands to gain that kind of trust quickly. Of course, they should follow suit and provide excellent service, build up a reputation for quality etc, but this takes time.

What they can do in the short term however, is to use some of the reasons mentioned here: a mobile site, guest checkout, effective use of PPC etc can all deliver relatively quick wins.

PS - a large number of senior JL staff have been Econsultancy subscribers for some years, so perhaps we can take a tiny bit of credit ;)

over 3 years ago

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Charles

Yes, I'm definitely not Darren barber, nor do I know the guy. Thanks to David and everyone on here for sharing - the comments are often the best source of information.

Just to clarify my two points, trust and reputation is built up over decades, generations, not just over a few months or years. Hence my point about the history of the company.

Secondly, the primary reason they are doing relatively so well in hard economic times is because they dominate in retail for the affluent demographic - the UK's rich, quite simply. They've done this by maintaining the highest-quality shopping experience.

...and back to my original point about this article being a little too self-serving. The only reason I said anything is that I like e-Consultancy and enjoy seeing it doing well but in news-related stories it needs to try not to skew reality by pushing out what steers towards an advert for their own product, and instead offer a properly objective piece of analysis. David, what you're written is an excellent description of what JL does online - maybe I should be blaming an over-exuberant sub for the misleading headline instead.

over 3 years ago

Graham Charlton

Graham Charlton, Editor in Chief at ClickZ Global

Charles - I really don't see your point. It's an article about JL's online success, hence the word 'online' in the title. There's nothing misleading about it at all. It does what it says on the tin.

We don't do news, we talk about what makes companies successful online and what others can take from that, which is exactly what this article does.

David has suggested 14 reasons for JL's online sales. He's not saying these are the only reasons, or dismissing other factors.

over 3 years ago

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Charles

I didn't say you "did news", I said this article was news-related, which it is - it's lifted straight from their corporate press release.

The article gives 14 reasons, all valid, and missed some other significant ones. Missing those others has made it of limited relevance. It's not just me saying these things.

Like I said, most of the stuff on here is very good, don't take it all to heart.

over 3 years ago

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Depesh Mandalia, Head of Digital Marketing at Lost My Name

I've seen similar posts on econsultancy like this, looking at good and bad points for various online businesses that most take for what it is, a point of reference for others with some expert insight and a dash of reader commentary.

I think the post is valid both in the Title (14 [of many] reasons for JL's 44% uplift in Online sales) and the content (14 [of many] relevant points of reference for the majority of readers here). The comments help further add additional views (everyone is entitled to an opinion of course) and both Charles and Darren add valid points about TV and the history of JL.

Either way it seems petty to belittle a thought provoking article IMHO, despite references to otherwise valid points

Look forward to reading more like this in 2013!

over 3 years ago

David Moth

David Moth, Editor & Head of Social at EconsultancyStaff

Thanks Depesh, I think you've summed it up perfectly :)

And as an aside, thanks to everyone who has taken the time to comment on this post. Reader comments are really useful for us as they often highlight points we might have missed or give us ideas for future posts - so please keep them coming!

over 3 years ago

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Shell Robshaw-Bryan

I always use JL as a shining example of how an effective ecommerce website should work. Their high customer service levels and excellent product warranties mean that they provide enough benefits to convert customers, without having to lower their prices.

A British retailer well and truly setting the standard for both high street retailers and ecommerce websites.

over 3 years ago

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Adam

Hi David,
I have to admit I was a little mislead by the title of your article. I expected to be told what JL have done THIS year to warrant a 44% increase in sales. A lot of the great points you raised about the JL online experience could very well have been things that were there in 2011, 2010, you get the jist...
What do you think they did differently in 2012 to warrant the 44% uplift?
Cheers!

over 3 years ago

David Williams

David Williams, Director of Online EMEA at Deckers LtdEnterprise

Adam, you just reiterated what I was going to add this morning....

Most of the website propositions (click and collect etc) have been there for a few years now, there is little that we can we see from the outside as to what has helped increase sales YOY. I'd bet my bottom dollar however, that year on year data and the ability to optimise against that is what is really reaping the rewards.

And to reiterate what also said elsewhere, the 'bedding in' of the multichannel experience within the business is probably now also reaping the rewards - I'd love to know how much Click and Collect is of the business compared to the previous year for example.

I also think the Comet factor is pretty substantial. With electrical sales up 31%, I bet another of my bottom dollars, that they saw the biggest increase in this category also.

over 3 years ago

David Moth

David Moth, Editor & Head of Social at EconsultancyStaff

@Adam, the aim was just to highlight a few of the things that John Lewis is doing well in terms of its ecommerce strategy.

Though the items on this list may not have been implemented this year, that doesn't mean they didn't influence the 44% increase. In fact, I'd suggest that it would be impossible for any recent campaigns or site upgrades to cause a 44% uplift in sales if these other factors hadn't been in place long term, and that includes the things that I didn't mention such as the extended warranty and years of excellent service.

And one of the main factors in the increase is probably something they had nothing to do with, which is the simple fact that more people shopped online in 2012 compared to 2011. It just seems that John Lewis is doing a better job of capturing the additional sales than its competitors are, thanks to the factors mentioned in this article.

over 3 years ago

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Simon Butcher

Surely these points are retailing 101. What JL are doing well is retailing and the rest are failing in retailing.

I see they are also getting into loyalty where others have failed and it will be interesting to see if they offer points unlike Waitrose. Uk shoppers have been brought up on points, anything else just isn't working. Interesting to see that their ads for analyst state that the loyalty scheme is for 3/5 years - loyal for who? Is this the term of loyalty - very interesting to have this in the public domain that a scheme has an end date before it begins. Why bother collecting points?

"To underpin this agenda a Loyalty programme is being launched which is expected to run for 3-5 years."

more here: http://bit.ly/UDnnfr

over 3 years ago

Paul Mead

Paul Mead, Founder & Managing Director at VCCP Media & VCCP Kin

This post just goes to prove the old adage that 'success has many fathers'! JL is a business that is getting the mix right. That's the key. The mix between offline and online, the mix between brand and DR, the mix between margin and service. One swallow doesn't make a summer and its a moot point to argue about whether the TV campaign or the extended warranties have a greater influence, they all play their part. JL is up against pure plays like Amazon which make that performance even more impressive and of course, lets not forget reason #42 - they pay their taxes in the UK!

over 3 years ago

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Edward Johnson

Hi All.

David, I think you've done a great job in provoking discussion, which is what it's all about. However, I do feel that a lot of the points you raise are a little generic, particularly the first few.

You say they do a lot of PPC (I've heard their budget is £1m per month, but I don't know!) but beyond them having a big budget there's nothing remarkable about this, and it's very difficult to say if they're doing it effectively without poking around in their account. Also a lot of your points about their on-site experience are pretty vague.

Points 2,3,4 & 5 are all things that JL seem to be doing fairly well but not exceptionally well. Ultimately they're all best practices that other people are doing better, so these points lose a lot of their force. I think some of the guys who have commented are right in that JL's success has a lot to do with less tangible offline things such as brand trust and the Christmas ads, which are becoming as much of an institution as the Coca-Cola ones.

Perhaps fewer points and more detail are needed? I think you actually put a lot of your more interesting points at the end of the article and do yourself an injustice.

over 3 years ago

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Spud

We succeeded at Christmas due to many factors.

1 Strategy, partners and customer focus
2 Planning and knowing what to aim for
3 Assortment + availability
4 Execution across the channels and brand (comms/trust/awareness/NKU)
5 Integration, data and contingency
6 Hard work and fun. Lots.

It's the best formula and coupled with every partner in the business we can succeed.

Must say though, strategy and planning really do pay off. If you're a retailer without a strategy and a plan then go home.

Media and marketing are a fraction of what drove success.

over 3 years ago

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Tara Leads

@Simon but I'm not sure that everyone would be able to follow in JL's footsteps.

about 3 years ago

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